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Survey: People Aren’t News Reading; They’re ‘News Snacking’ [Infographic]

infographicMobiles Republic, a global news syndication company, recently released the results from its 2013 survey of news reading habits.

The study, based off the responses of over 8,000 of its News RepublicĀ® app users, indicates that news consumption is rising; as the number of news outlets grows, so do readers’ appetites for accurate, multi-sourced and fresh news.

Here are key takeaways and the full infographic:

People are checking the news more frequently and for shorter amounts of time.

Forget news reading. Today, it’s all about “news snacking,” meaning people are checking the news more often and typically on mobile devices. 75 percent of readers with smartphones and 70 percent with tablets check the news more than once a day. Read more

Get Advice from the National Crowdfunding Association Executive Director

Trying to use crowdfunding sites to launch your next journalism project?

National Crowdfunding Association executive director David Marlett will lead a short Crowdfunding for Media webcast with Mediabistro. Follow this link to register:

In this webcast, David Marlett, executive director of the National Crowdfunding Association, will use examples from the audience to explain how just about any project can be successfully crowdfunded. David will also outline how upcoming legal changes will allow for equity crowdfunding and Reg D/accredited investor crowdfunding. You’ll learn how to: Choose the right platform and reach out to investors for your potential project. Raise the right amount of money and provide appropriate investor rewards. Identify entrepreneurs whose businesses might make good investments. Understand upcoming legal changes that will affect crowdfunding.

30 Holiday Gifts for Journalists 2012

Holidays are just around the corner and we know most of you who read this blog have a journalist or two in your life that you’ll be shopping for. Here are the recommendations from our entire 10,000 Words crew for journalistic, geeky, fun gifts. We also have a holiday gift guide from 2011 that is still relevant (2010, 2009 and 2008‘s versions are fun, too!). Anything we missed? Add your favorites and must-haves in the comments. Read more

30 Holiday Gifts For Journalists

Holidays are just around the corner and we know most of you who read this blog have a journalist or two in your life that you’ll be shopping for. Here are the recommendations from our entire 10,000 Words crew for journalistic, geeky, fun gifts. We also have holiday gift guidesĀ from 2008 and 2009 that are still relevant. Anything we missed? Add your favorites and must-haves in the comments. Read more

Photo tagging: Journalism's next social experiment

by Mark S. Luckie

Faces in the crowd are no longer just faces. Photo tagging allows people to identify themselves and others in a photo and the technology is starting to catch on as a tool for journalism. Sites like Facebook and Flickr have offered tagging options for some time, which means many readers already know why and how to use tagging.

So what are the benefits of tagging a photo? MLB.com has encouraged sports fans to tag themselves in the crowd of a recent baseball game. As mentioned previously, NPR used Flickr to encourage readers to tag attendees in the audience of a Senate hearing.

A high-resolution photograph shot at the Glastonbury Music Festival recently broke the record as the most tagged online image ever, with approximately 7000 concertgoers identifying themselves in the photo.

Photo tagging is also being used to identify faces in a class photo, as in the example below:

Photo tagging allows newsrooms to get an idea of who is in the crowd and possibly connect with those people by allowing readers or viewers to tag themselves in a photo. Tagging also lets readers participate and engage with the newsroom by contributing in a small way to the coverage.

So how do you get started tagging? Many news organizations already have Flickr accounts, so you can use the tool to allow people to tag photos. While some photo hosting tools like Twitpic and Picasa allow for tagging, Flickr is likely the best tool for news media to use.

Flickr already has a built-in user base who are familiar with the technology and those who don’t can catch on quickly. Plus, a basic account is free. Alternatively, you can use proprietary, paid tools like Thinglink to embed a photo on your own site and make it taggable.

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