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Elana Zak

3 Free Alternatives to CoveritLive

If you use the free version of CoveritLive to live blog news and events, you may want to stop reading now. The company has made some drastic changes to its plan models, essentially eliminating the free version of CoveritLive.

Now, the only unpaid option is just the trial mode, which includes a measly 25 clicks per month. For $10 a month, you get “Starter” access with 250 clicks and the “Lite” plan, at $49 a month, provides 2,500 clicks.

CiL is a favorite tool in many newsrooms so the price change may have negative impacts on already tight budgets. Some may not be able to afford to pay for liveblogging software and are now looking for other options. The first alternative that jumps to mind is ScribbleLive, a platform used by tons of newsrooms. It is, however, quite expensive and not that affordable.

Unfortunately, there aren’t many free alternatives to CoveritLive out there but we scoured the web to find you some options. Read more

How The Seattle Times Is Using Facebook Groups as a Crowdsourcing Tool

In the last few of weeks, two pretty big names in the news industry have used Facebook groups to crowdsource reporting.

ProPublica started a Patient Harm Community Facebook group to create a “community of people … who are interested in discussing patient harm, its causes and solutions.” Adrienne LaFrance over at Nieman Lab did a nice write up on the group and why ProPublica went that route.

The Seattle Times use of Facebook groups in its recent “Recession Generation” package also stood out.

The paper wanted to profile young people in the Seattle area who graduated college in 2009, during the height of the recession. When it came to finding high school graduates from the class of 2005, Sona Patel, producer for social media for the news org, decided to turn to Facebook. Read more

Apply Now to be a New Media Fellow at The Atlantic

If you’re not only an expert at using Tumblr, Twitter and Facebook but can edit video with the best of them, you should take a look at The Atlantic‘s 2012-2013 social media/multimedia fellowship.

The ad was posted on The Atlantic‘s Tumblr on Friday. Unfortunately, it doesn’t include details on whether the gig is paid or not The post has been updated to say it’s a paid, year-long job based in Washington, D.C. This is a great opportunity to get some hands-on social media and video experience at a great publication.

In addition to emailing over a resume, the editors would also “love to see the following”:

  • Your Twitter / Tumblr / Vimeo / YouTube / etc. pages
  • Anything cool you’ve made recently
  • A video someone else made that you think is great
  • A blog that you think is awesome
  • A meme that you think is awesome
  • A GIF that you think is awesome

To apply, send your resume and a cover letter to video@theatlantic.com.

4 Questions With Anjali Mullany, Social Media Editor at Fast Company

“Four Questions With …” is a monthly series of interviews with different social media and community editors in the news industry.

So, what is it like to be a social media or community editor? What are the job responsibilities and how does one end up landing such a gig? The goal of “Four Questions With …” is to answer some of these questions and to give insight into what is a new and constantly evolving field.

For the month of May, we chatted with Anjali Mullany, the social media editor at Fast Company. Previously, Mullany was social media editor at the New York Daily News. She started working with the Daily News in 2009 while a master’s student at New York University’s Studio 20, ultimately becoming the Daily News’ social media editor. In April, she left to become the social media editor at Fast Company.

Here are Mullany’s thoughts on social media, journalism and how technology is changing innovation in the field. Read more

Six Covers Newsweek Could Have Chosen For Its ‘First Gay President’ Issue

When it comes to blogging platform Tumblr, Newsweek has always led the pack. The news magazine is at it again — this time posting six alternative, although ultimately rejected, versions of its mildly controversial “First Gay President” cover on its Tumblr.

The picture that made the cut for the May 21 issue shows President Barack Obama with a rainbow-hued halo above his head (shown to the right). On the bottom left are printed the words “The First Gay President.”

In the Tumblr post, Brian Ries, Newsweek‘s current social media editor, writes, “Ah, our favorite nwktumblr feature is back: the also-rans! These are the alternate versions of our ’First Gay PresidentNewsweek cover that were left on the cutting room floor.”

See all six rejected covers after the jump.

Read more

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