GalleyCat FishbowlNY FishbowlDC UnBeige MediaJobsDaily SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser

Kevin Loker

Kevin Loker began writing for 10,000 Words in 2010 as a junior in college interning for The Washington Post. He took a break to finish his studies (in anthropology, with a focus on a technology and culture), but returned in summer 2012 to blog about technology trends and journalism, doing so outside of his day job as Digital Coordinator with the Online News Association. Email Kevin at kr.loker[at]gmail.com, and follow him on Twitter @kevinloker.

No Strategy for Twitter Favorites? 5 Ideas

It may not seem natural because of Facebook’s “like” button, but Twitter “favorites” can be for storytelling.

The page on which they are chronicled, after all, is a timeline of sorts, tracking whatever tweets you decide to attach a star. It’s essentially curation, even if often unused. It’s another platform to reach folks — particularly the most curious — and convey information, hopefully all while keeping an experience fluid.

I don’t know anyone who regularly checks a Twitter user’s favorites, of course. But favorites are there, and you have to expect it happens. At bare minimum, it’s fun to go poking around on your follower’s favorites and see how they’re using them.

So that’s what I did: poked around, but on the favorites pages of some journalism organizations I follow. The result? Usually some laughs (which isn’t necessarily bad).

Below are some examples of what I saw, some of which are kind of funny. The conclusion? Many a time, at least to the average user who stumbles upon them, a journalism organization’s usage of the “favorite” is rare and/or obscure.

The New York Times (@nytimes)

Kudos for favorite-ing that last one?

Read more

Create Interactive Infographics with Easel.ly and (Then) ThingLink

A reader (and fun Tweeter) had a smart idea following our post last week on using ThingLink creatively in journalism. I had to pass it along.

One of the ideas laid out in that post was how to quickly make infographics interactive, adding another meta-layer to the data you already made look pretty. Ivan Lajara, engagement editor for Digital First Media’s East Region, had an idea to make that even simpler:

Read more

5 Ideas for ThingLink’d Journalism

Interactives can easily take time, resources and skill-sets that not every newsroom (or individual journalist) has. For those situations, ThingLink is simple tool that anyone can pick up and use today (or, really, right now) and create an engaging experience that helps tell a story.

We’ve written about ThingLink before, but as more notable newsroom uses pop up, it’s worth again walking through where its strengths lay.

To do that recap: take a look at this interactive image that former contributor Elana Zaknow social media producer for The Wall Street Journal, used as an example in our previous piece. It was inspired by this tagged image by Berliner Morgenpost. Hover over the dots.

Read more

‘Now I Know’ Author is Real Person, and That’s How the E-Newsletter Works


Yesterday I delved into emotional design, and how to take the theory’s recognition of humanity – a “personality layer” – and bring it into the little details of all the things journalists regularly do in online space. Much of that dovetails with another characteristic people tend to like in real-life, and hopefully online, too: being authentic.

There are tons of engaging, seemingly honest personalities that do this right out there on the interwebs, but I thought I’d highlight one that was introduced to me earlier this summer. He’s especially worth learning from because 1) he does nice job with something that’s easy to have trouble with – an e-newsletter – and because 2) he’s grown a huge following for the e-newsletter—all as a side project. Read more

Emotional Design: How Recognizing Humanity of Readers Can Help Journalists Online

One of my favorite blogs to follow is a design blog that I’ve mentioned before, Smashing Magazine. It’s great because it’s functional (I can get around it), reliable (I know what I’m getting when I go there) and useful (I learn stuff). It’s also pretty. Moreover, I want to note that it’s pleasurable, too.

“Pleasurable” may sound like an odd descriptor for a website, but don’t judge me yet– take a look at it. And then take a look at its article about this very subject, “the personality layer.”

Emotion is one of the handiest online tools. Simon Schmid outlines why beautifully.

As such, if you click that link, you’ve got a double-whammy of a page to learn from: Smashing Magazine is home to good content like this piece on emotional design, and it’s an example of some emotional design itself. You may not notice the subtle emotional cues as you browse, but that’s also the point—even the smallest play to emotion helps keep readers engaged. Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>