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events

MediaShift Launches EducationShift to Move Journalism Education Forward

PBS MediaShift recently announced the launch of EducationShift, a revamped site to help bolster journalism education.

edshift post picSupported by both the Knight Foundation and the Scripps College of Communication, the re-tooled Education Shift site will feature increased coverage of classroom innovation as journalism and communications schools around the world wrestle with unprecedented technological changes. Read more

Where to Get Free or Low-Cost Digital Journalism Training

dig. journ feat picNeed to brush-up on your digital journalism skills? You might want to check-out some free or low-cost, online courses being offered within the next few months.

The Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley is always a good bet for training as is the Society of Professional Journalists and of course, Poynter’s News University. Read more

Improve Your Data Journalism Skills, For Free

In today’s journalism environment, data is abundant, but journalists skilled at collecting, interpreting and maximizing it are not as plentiful. These are real skills that can improve your reporting today and improve your job prospects in the future.

If one of your New Year’s Resolutions is to do your journalism job better (which probably should just be a standing resolution anyway), here’s a great free way reporters, editors and designers can improve their data journalism skills.

From European Journalism Centre, the people who brought us the Data Journalism Handbook, comes this five-week online course starting early in 2014: Doing Journalism With Data: First Steps and Skills

Among the topics to be covered by some industry experts: Read more

Watch Industry Pros Discuss the Future of Digital Longform Friday

logoComing up Friday, Dec. 6, several heavy hitters in the world of longform digital publishing will make appearances at Columbia University’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism to discuss the future of longer narratives online. Interested journalists can also watch a livestream of the event.

David Remnick of The New Yorker is on the bill at Friday’s one-day conference “The Future of Digital Longform” in Manhattan, as well as professionals from nonprofit investigative journalism effort ProPublica, science journalism venture Matter, the crowdfunded Narratively, Longform and The Atavist.

The event was planned for a couple reasons: 1) We’re smack dab in the middle of a really interesting movement in digital storytelling. Some call it a renaissance, even, and it’s clear that a new phenomenon has surfaced; as the Tow Center notes, narratives are being weaved together through multimedia, moving comics and powerful data instead of being one-dimensional. And, 2) Tow Center fellow Anna Hiatt, also of The Big Roundtable, which I’ve written about for the blog), is finished with her research about digital longform journalism, which is part of an ongoing look at the definitions and challenges of longer online news.

Over the course of the day, several important questions like “Just because we can design another “Snow Fall,” should we?” and, considering the fairly recent influx of startups for digital storytelling, the toughest question — “How do we pay writers?” — will be posed and pondered.

Read more

Why Journalists Should Be Hosting Sponsored Events

With a fresh school year ramping up, I’ve noticed several news publications beginning to big-time promote the special events they’re heading up this fall.

It seems like more of these kinds of gatherings keep popping up, or maybe it’s that they were there before and are now being Tweeted and Facebooked about more often.

For each organization, it’s a bit different. The Texas Tribune Festival packs tons of experts in the online paper’s coverage areas — energy, health care, public education, etc. — along with political big-wigs like Texas Sen. Wendy Davis and First Lady Anita Perry into a weekend of discussion about all things political in the Lone Star State. Only a couple of years old, the Festival is a huge deal in Austin and beyond. And the Trib’s Editor-in-Chief Evan Smith, who has become something of a poster child for raising big cash for online news, plays an important role in the weekend, helping to moderate discussion and serve as a reminder to guests why they’re all there – because of the Texas Tribune’s reporting and how it has proved itself in the world of Web journalism.

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