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Photojournalism

Quick! Pick Up These Helpful iPhone Apps Still On Sale

As a journalist, the only thing better than a piece of new equipment is a piece of new equipment for a rock-bottom price. Everyone is doing more with less these days, so it’s more important than ever to take advantage of sales that will boost your toolset without breaking the bank.

Luckily, those doldrum days between Christmas and New Years have become a boon for people who are looking for a good deal, and you can see that phenomenon no better than in the Apple app store. Whether you’re taking advantage of a new device or interested in updating your apps, these four products will become your go-to for on-the-fly reporting and task management — and might make you a better reporter in the process. Read more

How New Instagram Changes Your Journalism

Instagram has become an unlikely, yet important, online tool for journalists, bloggers and citizens. Not only is it a great way to shoot stylized photos and on-the-go location shots, but it’s also a smart outlet to turn to when looking for eyewitness accounts of major news — people often turn to Instagram thanks to its quick sharing with social media networks like Twitter and Facebook.

However, these past few weeks have changed the service in a radical way, and now is the time to determine whether it’s the right tool for your photos and your personal use.

1. You Won’t See it On Twitter

This season has been a rocky one for Instagram and one of its biggest propagators, Twitter. Two weeks ago, the companies had effectively “broken up,” with Instagram no longer hosting images through Twitter’s API. Twitter snapped back, effectively distributing its own Instagram clone (with filters to boot) right in its native TwitPic system. Read more

Freelancers With Multimedia Skills Wanted

“I come from a print background, and I think we have an advantage on the Web,” says Loop21′s newest EIC.

Instead of decrying the decline of print, Lisa Armstrong is embracing it, and making the site truly reflects the ethos of the Internet. “Rather than just presenting information to our audience, we want people to respond. So, whether it’s through some form of social media or on the website, we wanted it to be like we’re having a dialogue about issues that are important,” she said.

Armstrong is actively seeking new writers, and those who are new to the journalism game are just as welcome as seasoned pros. “It’s less about how many years you’ve been in the industry and more about what skills you bring to the table,” she said. And multimedia skills are in high demand. So if you can show off strong writing, reporting and multimedia chops, you might start landing regular assignments.

For more info, read How To Pitch: Loop21. [subscription required]

Instagram, Like Other Social Media, a ‘Police Scanner’ for a Demographic

Instagrammed screenshot of a picture of SnapRecognizing a new tool at The Boston Globe is a gateway to worthwhile discussion on social media strategy: not everyone likes, has access to or uses the same digital thing. And that’s great for journalism.

Journalism.co.uk has a nice read on the wall-o-local-Instagram pics that the Globe is test-driving in its newsroom. Appropriately named “Snap,” the project is a result of a partnership with the MIT Media Lab, and it displays every local Instagram image on a big map of the area. Neat on its own (i.e., worthy of an Instagrammed pic of its own), and notably, it’s also being used for helping find sources for local stories.

There’s definite newsroom utility to display social media data like this on a map. You naturally are exposed to events, with pictorial evidence, that you may not have otherwise paid attention towards. And you can can pinpoint where that action is happening. That’s practical on a day-to-day basis, and particularly helpful during event like Hurricane Sandy, where much is going on and you’re looking to move your reporting fast. It’s clearly a useful tool (and if it isn’t yet clear, I’d certainty love to play with it.)

What I think is worth noting beyond the obvious ingenuity, however, was the main story that according to the article Chris Marstall, creative technologist at the Boston Globe, actually produced during Hurricane Sandy. After spending “about eight hours staring at Snap” during the storm, this piece says that Marstall didn’t know what story to pick up and write. “Eventually I figured out that the interesting story to tell was that everybody was staying home and getting drunk in their apartments, doing a lot of day drinking,” he said.

Read more

Freelancers with Digital Savvy Wanted at Triathlete

Freelancers can find much opportunity at Triathlete.com, the website of the largest and oldest U.S. magazine that covers the sport. Writers, photographers and video shooters/editors are all welcome, and as group content director Kurt Hoy says, “If one person can function in all of these roles, even better.”

In fact, Hoy admits that what he’s really looking for is a single person to contribute every form of digital media, including social. Because the Triathlete.com staff is lean, they depend on contributors for nearly 35 percent of the site’s content each month. So pitching a multimedia package is sure to woo editors there.

For more information, read How To Pitch: Triathlete. [subscription required]

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