GalleyCat FishbowlNY FishbowlDC UnBeige MediaJobsDaily SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser

social media

RebelMouse Gets A Makeover

RebelMouseI’ve written about RebelMouse here before — it’s always been a pretty useful tool for curating your various social media accounts. But it’s entering new territory now. Publishers will have the chance to not only aggregate all their content but also use the platform to increase the impact of their viral stories and become a vital part of the social conversation.

Brands and media companies alike are constantly trying the crack the Facebook algorithm code plus keep up with the ebbs and flows of various social network popularity. RebelMouse founder Paul Berry (formerly head of technology at the Huffington Post) and his team are giving pubs a place to combine all their social happenings and create original content.

“RebelMouse is now a content management and distribution platform with comprehensive blogging and original authoring tools to make your content creation process as seamless as possible,” Berry wrote on RebelMouse’s blog.

As Capital New York‘s Johana Bhuiyan wrote, this move may make it competitive with blogging and CMS platform Medium. Animal lover website The Dodo was created entirely with RebelMouse, and it has seen incredible traffic figures because of RebelMouse’s capability of linking back to social media.

Read more

Why Are Only 60% of Journalists on Twitter?

ajr.jpgCan we talk about something? It looks like 2008 is calling and they want their newsrooms back. The American Journalism Review posted a piece this week with the headline “Some Newspapers to Staff: Social Media Isn’t Optional, It’s Mandatory.”

Everyone take a deep breath. It’s not totally ridiculous: The piece, written by Mary Ann Fischer, discusses the various ways newsrooms get editors and reporters on social media, how it’s hard to call it “mandatory,” and how social media guidelines should be “living breathing documents.”

All true.

Also, Dean Baquet hasn’t tweeted yet. But that’s not the worst of it. Fischer writes:

 Nearly 60 percent of journalists were on Twitter in 2013, according to a survey done by Oriella PR Network. San Francisco Chronicle managing editor Audrey Cooper said the lack of social media activity is more pronounced among print journalists. “If you look at your average newspaper editor, they don’t have thousands of followers like the editors of BuzzFeed,” she said. “As a group we tend to have not embraced digital media as much. That’s not good or bad, but it does raise the question of how do you perform in that space if you’re not a user of digital media.”

I just don’t know what to say aside from, hey, print people: It’s time to quit the boycott.

Read more

Social Journalism Hackathon Underway at RJI, #RJIhacks

hackbanner01_6Interested in hacking social journalism? The Reynold’s Journalism Institute at the Missouri School of Journalism is hosting a Hackathon event “[tackling] challenge questions that seek to discover new tools, business models and news services that deliver context-rich, real-time social journalism to users across digital platforms” this weekend.

While the happenings Saturday and Sunday are for a limited audience in San Francisco, anyone following the toughest aspects of hacking the future of journalism can keep up with the discussion on Twitter using the hashtag #RJIhacks. Attendees will be pitching their innovations, and workshops covering the PMP API, Google Research and Visualization, the Wayin API and the Chute API fill the Hackathon schedule.

For more information on RJI’s Social Journalism Hackathon, click here.

Muck Rack Adds Feature to Track Social Shares

muck-rack-bannerAre you a certified Muck Rack journalist? If you aren’t, you should be. It’s like a portfolio site, news feed, and job board all in one (and the daily newsletter isn’t too shabby either). No, I’m not on their payroll, but they run the one Twitter chat I can stand, and just came out with a new feature for journos to track their success on social media. It’s not exactly Chartbeat, but as a verified journo or Muck Rack Pro user, you can create PDF reports about your social shares.

I know — PDF reports? But it does acknowledge a real truth for journos in smaller markets where publishers still talk about the legacy of print and are frustrated by the transient nature of all things digital. (Oh, wait. That happens in New York, too.)

Sometimes it’s nice to have it on paper. You can bring it to a job interview for reference, slap it down on your editor’s desk when she questions your ability, or just hang it up on the newsroom refrigerator to taunt your coworkers. There are a lot of uses for PDFs.

There are even more uses to have a Muck Rack account though. It’s a nice little hub on the interwebs, so take some time this weekend to play around with it. You don’t have to generate PDFs all day to make it worthwhile.

How News Orgs Can Make Weather Interesting on Social Media

Weather forecasts can’t possibly be funny, right? But Digital Communities Manager at the Dallas Morning News, Michael Landauer, has made the impossible possible in his hilarious daily weather Facebook posts.

Poynter has been giving Landauer’s postings some love over the last week, but as I’m a Dallas native and follow the comical newspaperman on Facebook (he was my editor back in the day, when I wrote for the DMN as a Student Voice), I’ve been noticing Landauer’s unique take on weather for several weeks now. Another disclosure before we go further: I write for the DMN-owned content agency Speakeasy doing sponsored editorial, though that has nothing to do with the News‘ general Facebook presence.

Back to the weather. I read these posts each morning as I scroll through my Facebook feed in bed. Here are a few of Landauer’s most inspired works:

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>