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#myinternship: How Can We Make Internship Programs Better?

hamsterThis week, Doree Shafrir over at Buzzfeed wrote about the ‘internship hamster wheel,’ especially pervasive in our industry. She continued the discussion on Twitter under #myinternship, where a lot of current and ex-journo interns shared their woes, their ideas for making existing intern programs better, and rethinking the whole system entirely. In addition to being a fun and easy way to engage with her readers, there were some good anecdotes.

Here are some of the highlights:

 

 

 

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Don’t Miss the Jan. 14 #MuckedUp Chat on Digital Journalism Startups

photoTonight (Jan. 14) at 8 p.m. Eastern time, log into your Twitter feed and follow the hashtag #MuckedUp for Muck Rack’s weekly chat — this time, the topic is about digital entrepreneurship and journalism startups.

As Adam Popescu said in his event preview, “today’s journalism is like an avalanche of content that seems never ending.” Because of this fact, Popescu reasons there are two categories of journalists: “churnalists,” who thrive, at least for the short term, on the hustle and bustle of constant deadlines and producing tons of content — and then there’s the “entrepreneurial” type, who is more fulfilled in sniffing out underreported stories and earning a reputation as a topical expert.

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Journalists Who Tweet About Being Laid Off: Necessary or Just Awkward?

Bloomberg_News_logoWe’ve talked a lot on the blog about how Twitter for journalists can be a blessing and a curse.

It can be used for finding sources, breaking news and making connections regarding potential work — but for announcing you’ve been laid off?

Laurie Muchnick, who was the highly-respected books editor at Bloomberg up until Monday, tweeted this to her nearly 6,000 followers:

“Not sure how to put this so here goes: Bloomberg is cutting arts coverage, including books, so today was my last day there.”

Later in the day, the New York Times reported the employee cutbacks in the arts and sports departments, adding that Bloomberg plans to focus more on its finance and government beats instead.

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Some Findings About Twitter and the News, From Pew Research Center

PJ_13.11.01_twitterNews260A couple of weeks ago we learned how Americans consume news on Facebook, and according to a study released by the Pew Research Center Monday, we now know more about the connection between the news and Twitter — Twitter users are “younger, more mobile and more educated.”

The last study Pew did, along with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, indicated that 30 percent of people actually use Facebook partially as a news source. For Twitter, the number is much lower — eight percent of U.S. adults log in for tweets about news. Only 16 percent of American adults use Twitter at all.

Forty percent of Twitter news consumers hold at least a bachelor’s degree (for Facebook, that number is 30 percent), and nearly half of Twitter news-readers are 18-29 years old, according to Pew.

Amy Mitchell and Emily Guskin with the Pew Research Journalism Project also wrote that the research consisted of Twitter conversation analysis. Here’s what that breakdown revealed: “much of what gets posted centers on passing along breaking news; sentiments shift considerably over time; and however passionate, the conversations do not necessarily track with public opinion,” Mitchell and Guskin wrote. The only somewhat surprising fact among those three is how much the opinions of Twitter users can change over the course of a few days. Pew took ten major news events over the last year (Newtown, the Supreme Courts same-sex marriage hearing, presidential election, etc.) and zeroed in on Twitter users’ sentiments; you can read more about how they came to those conclusions here.

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How Dallas Reporters Used Twitter to Get Un-Banned From Public Meeting

Twitter-birdI don’t think I can say it any better than Dallas Morning News reporter Tristan Hallman said it, when he blogged for the News about how he and a handful of local TV reporters were banned from a public, town hall-style meeting involving the Dallas Police Chief one night earlier this week:

“So last night was weird. For 40 minutes, reporters were banned from a public meeting with public officials in a public building.”

Definitely a weird moment, but especially unique was the way those reporters changed the outcome of their night through their tweets.

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