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Uncertain Future for NY Times Reporter Protecting Confidential Source

New York Times reporter James Risen

New York Times reporter James Risen, photo via Alex Menendez, UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

It’s been more than three months since the Supreme Court turned down an appeal from Pulitzer-winning New York Times investigative reporter James Risen, who continues to face the looming threat of jail over his refusal to reveal a confidential source.

Back in June, the Supreme Court basically sided with the government by turning down Risen’s appeal related to a case whereby prosecutors are attempting to secure evidence in what they say is a national security prosecution.

In turn, journalists contend the government is infringing upon Risen’s press freedom by demanding he turn over a confidential source from a chapter in his 2006 book, State of War. Read more

$5,000 Top Prize for Gannett Foundation’s Al Neuharth Award for Investigative Journalism

Al Neuharth, founder of USA Today.  Photo via mije.org

Al Neuharth, founder of USA Today. Photo via mije.org

The Gannett Foundation’s Al Neuharth Award for Investigative Journalism is seeking investigative reporters who broke ground in the past year. Read more

Best World Cup Coverage Around the Web

nytwc14.jpgIf you don’t have soccer fever yet, I feel sorry for you. It’s the one sport I can actually tolerate, and thanks to an extended overseas stint, know how to watch. With the World Cup playing on every television screen I walk by, it’s hard to not feel like there’s a extended holiday (and if the U.S. advances, it will only get more interesting).

Because I am a soccer geek, I’ve been consuming every bit of content I can find. Explainers that I don’t really need, background on Brazil, and listicles of the most attractive goalies from Ghana to Chile. Here are some of my favorite outlets for the game.

1) The New York Times. The New York Times has made downtime between the noon and three’o'clock games much more informative. Not only is their World Cup homepage clean and easy to follow — you don’t have to fight to find rankings and schedules —  they have great interactives like these diagrams of the clubs that national players come from. There’s also a great collection of essays about how different countries play the game that’s enough to make even the most skeptical soccer fan swoon a little for the game.

2) Vox. True to their mission, Vox does a lot of explaining and curating the World Cup. There’s the primer for those who want to care, but don’t really. And this collection of GIFs that not only shows some of the most popular (or infamous) players, but also has enough stats to fake a conversation with someone about Messi’s performance in past Cups.

3) Slate. By far, I have found myself tweeting and clicking on Slate’s coverage the most. Covering all things cultural surrounding the games, they take taje World Cup to another level with  this explainer about how Mexicans cheer, the ultimate defense of objectifying  soccer players, and my favorite: the Jerk Watch.

How are your favorite news outlets covering the games? Share your favorite World Cup content with me in the comments or @10,000Words.

Kickstarter Launches Journalism-Focused Category

journokickstarterToday, Kickstarter announced that it will be giving journalism projects their very own space. So whether you want to fund a magazine or a reporting adventure, you have a place to do it.

Along with the subcategory, The Guardian announced that they will manage their own curated page of projects. There are over 900 journalism focused projects, so it’s nice to have someone organize them for you. For good reason, too. On the main Journalism page, stories about drones, Iran at the World Cup, and bitcoin explainers are shown alongside “When a Ginger Travels Abroad.” On the Guardian‘s page, most of the projects are already funded — like the automated FOIA requests from the CIR. But there are still causes you can get behind, like this “shamelessly retro” paper delivery service in San Franciso. Of course.

Have a journalism project on Kickstarter? Tweet them to us @10,000Words or share in the comments.

Image via Kickstarter

Link Round Up: The Only Things You Need to Read About Jill Abramson and the NYT

timestattooAre you exhausted, too? It’s been over a week and I finally stopped reading every piece of commentary, reporting, and bloviating over Jill Abramson’s termination and the general mess over at the New York Times. How many keys have been clicked over the fate of equal pay and digital innovation? How many hours thumbing through a Twitter feed? A lot. Luckily for you, whether you can’t stop obsessing over it or were too swamped to care, I managed to find a few gems.

Here are the must reads so you can hold your end of a conversation on the matter at your Memorial Day barbeque with all your media minded friends (because you know everyone you know works in the biz, too, right?).

Mathew Ingram over at GigaOM always has good insight on all things digital and in this piece he manages to see a bigger problem below the noise about the executive changes over at the Grey Lady. Conclusion? The Times‘ problems are real, and Baquet likes print a little too much. Now is not the time for nostalgia. Here’s hoping.

And then there was solidarity and humor. Another self described “bossy lady,Kara Swisher, penned a post last weekend about what it means to be a “pushy” woman in media and how the Times bungled the whole ordeal. And this:

Let me see if I can say it more simply than Sulzberger: She was a real pain in my ass and so she had to go. I can relate, to say the least. As one of the few top editors in tech journalism who is a woman and, even from my many years of reporting before that, I cannot tell you the number of times that I have been called a pain in the ass for my aggressive manner. Silly me, but that kind of tonality is exactly what makes for a successful journalist — you know, afflict the comfortable and comfort the afflicted — and what is more often than not needed in the sometimes rough-and-tumble world of media.

Newly appointed editor over at Fusion Margarita Noriega had a reaction similar to mine — and even if you’re sick of reading about Abramson, this (and all of her tweets and tiny posts) are required reading if you want to be my friend. “Hey media, get a clue,” sums everything up. And has good Larry David GIFs.

Lastly, if you insist on delving into it (which is probably a decent idea), read only the analysis by Ken Doctor and the summary of that leaked (printed!) innovation report over at Nieman Lab.

Your welcome. I’m going to take a much needed unofficial start of summer weekend break from Twitter and the future of digital newsrooms, now. I’ve had enough.

Image via The Cut

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