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AP To Spell Out State Names, Reporters Complain on Twitter

ap tweetThe AP announced that it will start to spell out state’s names in stories. That’s annoying, if only because I’ve finally got my abbreviations down.

Two things:

1) I get that it’s about clarity, but what about character limits? Does anyone prefer spelling state names out? If you read the full memo, it seems more confusing than not.

2) Since my gut reaction is “why bother? I’m thinking the AP is out of date. Buzzfeed says to lowercase ‘internet,’ and the AP says to capitalize it. In an increasingly mobile and digital first world, why don’t we make things easy and more conversational?

I’m not the only one who’s unimpressed, either. Share your AP woes with us in the comments or tweet them to us @10,000Words.

Miami Herald Wins April Sidney Award For Project On Abused FL Kids

 

photo via cpexecutive.com

photo via cpexecutive.com

Journalists Carol Marbin Miller and Audra D.S. Burch of the Miami Herald won the April Sidney Award for “Innocents Lost“, an investigative multi-media package that spotlighted more than 400 Florida children who died due to abuse or neglect even after the state’s child protection authorities confirmed mistreatment at home yet failed to act.

Started in 2009, the Sidney Award is given monthly to honor outstanding socially-conscious, investigative journalism that encourages social and economic justice. Read more

Finalists Announced for 2014 Michael Kelly Award

m.kelly-post-pic-165x300Atlantic Media recently announced four finalists competing for the 11th annual Michael Kelly Award, honoring the “fearless pursuit and expression of truth.”

The award, created in honor of journalist Michael Kelly, is sponsored by Atlantic Media, owners of two publications where Kelly had served as editor, The Atlantic and National Journal. Read more

OMG! The Robo-Journo Has Arrived. It’s Going to Be OK.

robotEverybody take a deep breath. Robots are not journalists, and they aren’t going to take over the publishing industry. Or will they?

Since it came out that the L.A. Times used an algorithm to report on an earthquake, it seems that robots are going to take over all of journalism. There’s a good case for using technology like this: stories on sports, financial news, weather; probably half of the press releases about amazing new mobile apps I get, could probably be written with a code. There’s also a good case for why it’s still sort of uncharted territory that needs to be built upon and perfected.

And it’s prompted some  good questions: Who owns the copyright? Where and when would it be more efficient? If stories are generated using a code, does that change how humans interact with it? Does the code know ethics? Read more

MediaShift Launches EducationShift to Move Journalism Education Forward

PBS MediaShift recently announced the launch of EducationShift, a revamped site to help bolster journalism education.

edshift post picSupported by both the Knight Foundation and the Scripps College of Communication, the re-tooled Education Shift site will feature increased coverage of classroom innovation as journalism and communications schools around the world wrestle with unprecedented technological changes. Read more

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