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Archives: July 2012

An Interview with Ebyline’s Bill Momary

Ebyline, a content management platform, connects freelancers and publishers to create quality content. Founded in 2009 by Bill Momary and Allen Narcisse, Ebyline’s software allows publishers to find freelancers, assign stories and deliver payments through one platform. Freelancers can pitch story ideas to publishers through the service, and the site includes a content marketplace for publishers to buy and distribute content.

Momary, CEO and co-founder of Ebyline, previously had roles with the Ventura County Star and the Los Angeles Times. He shared some of his thoughts with 10,000 Words on Ebyline, the future of content and changes in the media industry. Read more

10,000 Words Founder Mark Luckie Talks About His New Job at Twitter

As the manager of journalism and news at Twitter, 10,000 Words founder Mark Luckie is still working “where journalism and technology meet.” In his interview with Mediabistro, Luckie describes his new role at the colossal social media platform and how he is still working with journalists to make the most out of the digital space.

“There are a lot of things that journalism organizations want from Twitter, and I’m sort of like the inside man who’s working on behalf of journalists to say, ‘Hey this is what journalists need to be able to do their jobs on Twitter,’” he said.

And what are his favorite Twitter tips for journalists? “I love live chats. I love that journalists have taken on conducting live chats with readers with no sort of interference or handling by the company itself. I love taking hashtags and taking them to the next level, really ask questions via hashtags,” he said.

Read more in Hey, How’d You Become Twitter’s Manager of Journalism and News, Mark Luckie? [AvantGuild subscription required]

Find great social media jobs on our job board. For real-time openings and employment news, follow @MBJobPost.

‘7 Habits’ (and Tools) for Highly Effective Journalists

Headlines following the recent passing of Stephen R. Covey have mostly included reference to the management and self-help guru’s immensely successful book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

The permeant reference is with good reason: the book was on The New York Times best seller list for more than five years, and it’s sold over 25 million copies to date. As I reflected on the best way to manage my own career, I couldn’t help but think about how Covey’s book probably had good insight in its pages for me, too — a journalist who fights the demands of an always-on news cycle, yes, but also a person. A normal human being.

Journalists are people, too. Here are some takeaways for how Covey’s seven habits can apply to our field, along with some practical tools and strategies to begin making them your habits, too. Read more

6 Reasons a Journalism Degree Is Still Necessary

There’s been much ado about why going to J-school is useless. You can learn to blog and write on the job, they say. The dearth of jobs means you probably won’t be able to cover the cost of those student loans, explain critics. But what about the pros of a formal journalism education?

For one, journalism grads are schooled on the basics of the biz, like handling embargoes, AP style and avoiding libel and slander claims.

“I was definitely in for a rude awakening when I started,” said Anne Urda, an assistant managing editor at Law360 with a master’s in journalism from NYU. “I thought, ‘Hey, I’m a decent writer, I can do this,’ but it really does require a different set of skills and an actual education in the importance of a good lede, asking the right questions of your sources, etc. etc. While you can pick that up along the way in a job, it’s very difficult to find the right mentor or someone who is going to take the time to school you in those fundamentals when you are up against real-world deadlines.”

Read more in Mediabistro’s latest AvantGuild feature, 6 Reasons a Journalism Degree Is Still Necessary, and let us know your thoughts. Was your degree worth it? [subscription required]

UC Berkeley Launches Mobile Reporting Field Guide

A new journalist reference guide on tools and applications that can be used for iPhone reporting has launched from UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism.

Although the book is called a “mobile” reporting guide, it’s actually device-specific, focusing specifically on the iPhone.  You can download the book to read as a PDF, or download it from the Apple iBook store.

The book reviews various apps, gear and recommendations for a mobile “kit” that covers “everything you would need to cover breaking news or conduct a two person interview.”

Students Casey Capachi, Matt Sarnecki and Evan Wagstaff are credited for their contributions.

Download the PDF | Get the iBook version

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