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Archives: August 2012

Sharing Visually on Facebook: How Can It Get Readers to Your Site, Too?

I like photos. I tend to “Like” them, too. But despite my “clicks of approval” (read: we never really know what Likes mean), I don’t always click through to content when a news org shares an image.

Maybe everyone is more systematic than I am, but my Likes are pretty arbitrary. I’m calculated about a lot of things, but my commenting is pretty arbitrary, too.

Two things to healthily recognize here: “Liking” isn’t unvaluable to a news org, and neither is commenting. We can measure some value with those statistics and participate in a “Like science.” At the same time, measurement of engagement on something like Facebook may be inexact when you’re looking at all kinds of journalistic impact. (See good discussion on better measuring journalism’s impact here.)

Putting some of that conversation aside, if your journalistic meat doesn’t lay in Facebook’s garden, my gut is you want your audience to stay awhile on the content on your site. For whatever reason or combination of reasons—financial or philosophical.

If that’s you, here’s a good question worth considering: How do you share visually on Facebook and additionally draw in website traffic?

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5 Mobile Stats Worth Mentioning to Journalists

 

Shortly after recently announcing the theme of  this year’s third News Challenge installment  – “mobile” — the Knight Foundation tweeted an impressive stat backing up reasoning for its choice: there are 6 billion mobile devices worldwide.

Billion. With a “B.”

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What Newspapers Can Learn from ‘Medium’

I’ve harped on it before and I’m nowhere close to being done: news design and consumption experiences are completely broken. Medium, a new platform from Twitter founder Ev Williams, takes a new approach to (among other things) content design — and there’s a lot the news industry can learn from them.

So when I say news design, I’m not talking about fonts and colors, though that’s certainly part of it. I’m talking consumer design. I’m talking how it functions and how the various parts connect. The folks at Medium are talking about that, too. From their about page (emphasis added by me):

Still, some things haven’t evolved as much as we would have expected. Lots of services have successfully lowered the bar for sharing information, but there’s been less progress toward raising the quality of what’s produced. While it’s great that you can be a one-person media company, it’d be even better if there were more ways you could work with others. And in many ways, the web is still mimicking print concepts, while not even catching up to it in terms of layout, design, and clarity of experience.

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How Should Newspapers Respond To Criticism On Their Facebook Page?

What would you do if someone came to your Facebook wall and started writing mean things about you or your work? You’d probably de-friend them, or at least delete the comments. But is that the way a news organization should respond? Does it matter that the industry is built on the very foundation of giving everyone a voice and space to share their opinions?

This question came up this week when the editor of the Hanford Sentinel posted this on the organization’s Facebook wall:

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Richard Prince on Why Students Should Study Journalism

In the face of newsroom cuts and industry-wide belt-tightening, Richard Prince still thinks it’s a good idea to get a journalism degree. In Mediabistro’s latest So What Do You Do? interview, Prince remembers how j-school connections helped him land a gig at New Jersey’s Star-Ledger and Washington Post.

“Primarily, it gives you a leg up in terms of the contacts that you make,” the man behind the Maynard Institute’s “Journal-isms” column explained. “That’s how I got that first job in New Jersey. I was at the Society of Professional Journalists, they were having an induction ceremony, and the editor of the Star-Ledger came to the ceremony. We struck up a conversation, and that started me on the path to that first job. In fact, that’s also how my next job at the Post came about. They had a reporter call the journalism department at NYU and sort of say, ‘Who do you have?’”

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Richard Prince, Columnist for the Maynard Institute?

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