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Archives: November 2012

A Journalist’s Quick Primer on Who Uses Cell Phones (and How)

A big push in journalism right now? Mobile. An important piece of information for knowing how to make a good journalism strategy for mobile? How people actually use mobile.

There are many types of “mobile” out there, of course (mobile phones, yes, but also an increasing amount of tablets and the like). But the Pew Internet and American Life project just compiled much of its research on cell phone usage and demographic statistics into one handy location. And because the cell phone is still the major mobile device, I thought it might prove helpful to highlight some significant stats as they relate to journalism strategy.

Many of these stats may at first seem most helpful to those dabbling in the business of journalism, but knowing them could also benefit to the savvy journalist. Some stats may be promising for your strategy; some may be a reality check. In any case, “knowing your audience” (and source) is always important, as we have blogged about heavily as of late.

The connected world is not quite flat. It’s worthwhile to have a baseline of probability for content success or finding the right social voices in a pinch.

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With ThingLink, Interactive Images in Tweets

We’ve given ThingLink a lot of love here at 10,000 Words, but the easy-to-use interactive image-maker merits another post because of its new functionality: working on the Twitters.

Users can now share an image on Twitter complete with any created ThingLink meta-data, and it’s all accessible in the tweet itself. That means that, for better or worse, a new level of engagement and storytelling is possible right in the platform of Twitter. A user doesn’t have click to a new page to see  a ThingLink’d image. And a tweet can now contain a short bit of text, an image and several, several links.

Here’s an example of a popular White House photo making its way around the net this weekend. You’re probably already seen it. If not, I explain using ThingLink’s own features.

Here’s that image ThingLink’d and working directly in a tweet: Read more

Video: The Impact Of Twitter On Journalism

PBS Arts Off Book put out this interesting, short video this week with some thoughts from a few leading minds in the digital journalism sphere (including Mark Luckie, the 10,000 Words founder and current manager of journalism and news at Twitter). The subject is all about how Twitter has impacted journalism and journalists’ role in using the service to source news and be a source of news. I wanted to pass it on because some of the points the speakers (Luckie, Jeff Jarvis, Craig Kanalley and Chris Anderson) brought up were important to think over, including the role of journalists as the filter for Tweets/breaking news and also the importance of realizing a lot of sources and people aren’t on Twitter or Facebook. Anyway, it’s only about 5 minutes long. Watch it.

Cubes: Conde Nast Shows Off Its Lucky Side

Conde´ Nast recently hosted MediabistroTV at its Times Square offices. Lucky magazine style editor and network television morning show contributor Lori Bergamotto walked the crew through Lucky’s offices revealing the hidden corners where nail polish and make up are put through their paces, colors and fabric samples are checked by the art department, shoes and handbags await their close-ups and racks of outfits hang around waiting for their models.

Take a look at all the small parts that make up a big fashion magazine like Lucky.

Next Thursday MediabistroTV premieres, “My First Big Break: Ken Burns.” You can view our other MediabistroTV productions on our YouTube Channel.

Tablets May Fuel Print Magazine Market, Report Says

A report released earlier this week by the United Kingdom’s Professional Publishers Association (PPA) reveals that tablet users are engaging with digital magazines. No surprise, right?

What is interesting about this report, though, is that the PPA also notes that there appears to be a “positive correlation between print and tablet readership.” In fact, according to the report, 96 percent of tablet owners have read a PRINTED magazine in the last year, compared to the 80 percent national average.

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