GalleyCat FishbowlNY FishbowlDC UnBeige MediaJobsDaily SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser

Archives: January 2014

Still Making Summer Plans? Deadline Nears For Google’s Journalism Fellowship

It’s the time of year when young journalists start hearing back about their internship applications or perhaps getting worried if they haven’t heard back yet.

googleIf you haven’t already received and accepted an offer and made your summer plans, you still have some time to apply for one of the coolest opportunities available this summer: the Google Journalism Fellowship. But not much time — the deadline is this week.

This isn’t your typical summer internship, though. It’s something more immersive, more data-centric and, honestly, sounds more fun. They’re looking for journalism students who have already demonstrated proficiency and interest in digital projects and technologies, but the desired skills and interests are pretty reasonable for j-school students these days. Here’s how they describe the gig:

The program is aimed at undergraduate, graduate and journalism students interested in using technology to tell stories in new and dynamic ways. The Fellows will get the opportunity to spend the summer contributing to a variety of organizations — from those that are steeped in investigative journalism to those working for press freedom around the world and to those that are helping the industry figure out its future in the digital age. There will be a focus on data driven journalism, online free expression and rethinking the business of journalism.

And they will pay the fellows $8,000 (plus a travel stipend) for 10 weeks, from June through August, to work at one of these journalism organizations:

  • Center for Investigative Reporting
  • Committee to Protect Journalists
  • Investigative Reporters & Editors
  • Nieman Journalism Lab
  • Pew Research Center’s Journalism Project
  • Poynter
  • PRI.org
  • ProPublica
  • Sunlight Foundation
  • Texas Tribune

This application is due Friday, January 31… So, um, why are you wasting time?! Apply here.

Will Newspeg Become Pinterest for Journalists?

newspegCan you handle another news curation tool being thrown into the fray? If so, look to Newspeg, developed by longtime, “recovering” journalist Mark Potts.

You’ve heard the concept before — there is a ton of information on the interwebs. How can you possibly sort through it all? Feed readers? Apps like Flipboard, Contently and the newest member of the social news reader family Trove serve as ample solutions to sifting through the noise to filter down to what you want. And now Newspeg —  being “pegged” by some already ( sorry, can’t resist an opportunity to make a shameless pun) as “Pinterest” for news — offers a platform for sharing (pegging/pinning) articles that you deem important enough to tell others about or save for later reading. The site’s name evokes the nostalgic image of cutting out a favorite newspaper article and pinning it to a bulletin board or attaching it to the refrigerator, but since that’s not cool anymore, we get Newspeg.

Visually, Newspeg looks like a combination of Pinterest (naturally) and a bit like WaPo’s Know More blog with its tiles, each one displaying the piece’s title, original source and a small image, as well as who pegged the post. Once you sign up, you can install the “Peg It” button on your browser for easy capture of your favorite stories, and you can categorize your posts on self-named boards. From skimming the site, I saw boards with topics as broad as “Politics” and as specific as “Acetaminophen News.”

Read more

Where to Get Free or Low-Cost Digital Journalism Training

dig. journ feat picNeed to brush-up on your digital journalism skills? You might want to check-out some free or low-cost, online courses being offered within the next few months.

The Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley is always a good bet for training as is the Society of Professional Journalists and of course, Poynter’s News University. Read more

The Great Gmail Outage of 2014

googleGmail’s is down and on a wintry Friday afternoon, that should be a good thing. Or, not.

Here’s what we learned about ourselves when email stops working:

It was pretty frustrating.

 

And we learned that we sort of miss things we don’t even like, or use.

We learned that Yahoo has an account.

  That there might be life away from the computer.

That email breaks are always good for traffic.

And, some sound advice for journos, in case this ever happens again.

Haters Will Hate: Why Shouldn’t Ezra Klein Start His Own Media Company?

ezraklein1If I were friends with Ezra Klein, I would tell him to keep his chin up this week. As you might have read, he’s leaving the Post and Wonkblog, effective immediately, to start his own media venture, after the Post decided they wouldn’t be interested in investing a reported $10 million and hiring three dozen people to help him do it.

The general consensus is that Klein is going to need more luck than funding to make this work.

 

It’s not going to be easy — as many have pointed out — relying on advertising and his brand won’t be enough. John McDermott over at Digiday points out that Re/Code’s Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg need to charge thousands of dollars for conference tickets to make it work, Grantland has ESPN’s big name to draw national brands, Glenn Greenwald has a billionaire backer and Andrew Sullivan is, well, Andrew Sullivan. Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>