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Posts Tagged ‘ap’

TV Reigns In News Consumption and More Surprises in ‘Personal News Cycle’ Study

Fewer than 50 percent of the API's sample set said they used an online-only reporting service to find news. Eighty-two percent said they went straight to local TV news.

Fewer than 50 percent of the API’s sample set said they used an online-only reporting service to find news. Eighty-two percent said they went straight to local TV news.

An exciting new partnership between the American Press Institute (API) and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research called the Media Insight Project has produced a study called “The Personal News Cycle: How Americans choose to get their news”.

The Media Insight Project’s main goal is to “understand changing news audiences” through a series of polls and studies, the initiative’s leaders announced in a press release last week.

“We created the AP-NORC Center to serve the news industry by making the best social science research available to journalists and the public in order to promote a greater understanding of social trends,” AP-NORC Center Director Trevor Tompson said.

Based on a telephone survey of 1,492 adults across the nation conducted from Jan. 9 to Feb. 16, 2014, here are a few of the study’s key takeaways, published on March 17:

Consumers will find the news they want on the technology that is most convenient

According to the Media Insight Project, traditional media is still relevant for sifting through the news. Respondents used at least four devices to either discover or follow up on stories in a single week, but the tools used may surprise you. “The most frequently utilized devices include television (87 percent), laptops/computers (69 percent), radio (65 percent), and print newspapers or magazines (61 percent),” reported API. The same people said they preferred television to computers for consuming news 24 percent to 12 percent, with cell phones and tablets at 12 and four percent, respectively. ”People who own and use more devices are no more or less likely to use print publications, television, or radio to access the news,” read the study.

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

How Secure Are Your Social Media Accounts?

A hacked Twitter account is nothing new. Unfortunately, on a regular basis I get suspicious direct messages and tweets from friends and followers with links to who knows where. They’ve been hacked. Usually, their friends flag that and it’s quickly cleaned up.

But what happens when that hacked account has more than a half million followers? When it’s verified and belongs to one of the most venerable international news organizations? When the hacked content isn’t a questionable link but what would be the most major national security story since maybe ever?

Well, that happened yesterday when the Associated Press saw its account compromised and 71 hijacked characters about explosions at the White House sent the stock markets briefly down and got notice of everyone from the FBI to the SEC. The hacked account was quickly taken offline and suspended. But as Ryan Sholin pointed out this morning when the account was reinstated (but briefly before the offending tweet could be deleted) — more than 4,000 people had retweeted that note (and those are only the ones who used the RT button instead of quoting or adding their own commentary). Read more

AP Stylebook Updates Detail How To Handle User-Generated Content

AP StylebookThe Associated Press Stylebook is on a tech kick with its latest updates. Among the new additions, according to a note to online stylebook subscribers: Android, circles (as in Google Plus groups), flash mob, Google Hangout, hashtag, Instagram, Pinterest, Reddit, retweet, Skype and tablet. The User-Generated Content entry has also been expanded.

The updates were added to the online stylebook and emailed to subscribers on Friday. Since so much of online journalism these days relies on references or links to user-generated/citizen journalism pieces (photos/video taken at the scene by non-journalists or accounts of events shared on social media, for example), I wanted to highlight this addition in particular:
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AP Sues Meltwater News Aggregator For Unlicensed Content Use

The Associated Press says it’s filed a lawsuit today against news aggregator Meltwater News in U.S. District Court. The suit claims that Norway-based Meltwater — a paid electronic clipping service that monitors and delivers news stories on keyword-specific topics to its paying customers — spreads original AP content verbatim without paying licensing fees. Those fees help support the AP’s news gathering, but also add costs that Meltwater doesn’t incur, which allows it to offer its service cheaper than the AP, thereby undercutting and competing directly against the news service.

AP President and CEO Tom Curley described the organization as a “parasitic distribution service” in a statement. He says the service “competes directly with traditional news sources without paying license fees to cover the costs of creating those stories. It has a significant negative impact on the ability of AP to continue providing the high-quality news reports on which the public relies.”
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AP: More Than Half of Countries with FOI Laws Don’t Follow Them

A new study led by the Associated Press shows that more than 50 percent of countries with freedom of information (FOI) laws do not follow them.

In January, the AP sent out “questions regarding terrorism arrests and convictions to the European Union and the 105 countries with right-to-know laws or constitutional provisions.” Only 14 of the 105 countries included answered the questions in full and within the legal deadline. Read more

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