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Posts Tagged ‘CNN’

Grading the Media on Ferguson Coverage

Now that the Ferguson protests are slowly beginning to wind down, it’s likely a good time to assess how the media handled the coverage of the recent unrest, triggered by the police shooting of unarmed teen, Michael Brown.

From the coverage I’ve seen myself, I would have to grade the media a C to C-, mainly for coverage that I thought was uneven, at best, with some national reporters even crossing journalistic lines to become advocates, rather than unbiased, objective third-parties. Read more

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The Problem With Citizen Journalism

Citizen journalism is a lofty little term thrown around by interweb idealists.* This week, Trevor Knoblich wrote a column on PBS’ MediaShift blog asking “Can Citizen Journalism Move Past Crisis Reporting?”

No, no, it can’t. 

The first lonely comment under the article was from an editor of CNN’s iReport, championing the organization’s efforts to help citizens gather and report stories that are meaningful to them and their community. The idea is a noble one, and it’s executed pretty well. They give tips on good storytelling and provide free music clips you can use with your video. There’s even an Assignment Desk where editors ask for submissions on a given topic (this weekend it’s ‘Show Off Your Mom Tattoos’). 

It’s not that I am against any of the actually very good work iReport can curate. It’s that most of the contributions have the “not vetted” by CNN label which means they’re the equivalent of a YouTube video about your student debt, the plight of tipped workers, or, your mom tattoo.

Remember the editorial pages of your local newspaper? Read more

Mobile Users Turn to Established News Sources, Survey Says

There’s a new survey out that paints an interesting picture about how digital news consumers are getting their news. The survey, which was backed by The New York Times, gathered responses from 3,022 U.S. adults between the ages of 18 and 65 to understand the news sources users are accessing.

Of those adults surveyed, 85 percent were categorized as “news consumers” who access news multiple times per week.

According to a Poynter article on the survey, 53 percent of “digital news consumers” noted that they turn to Web-native sources, such as The Huffington Post, Yahoo News, or Drudge Report. Compare this to 43 percent of news consumers who said that they access “established news” organizations, such as The New York Times or CNN, to get their news.

Read more

News Sites Prepare Online Coverage Of Presidential Debate

Tonight marks the first official presidential campaign debate between President Barack Obama and Governor Mitt Romney. It’s taking place in Denver (at 9 p.m. Eastern, or 6 p.m. Pacific), but since you likely haven’t snagged a seat, your options for viewing are plentiful this election year. You may not have determined who you’re voting for let alone figured out how you’re watching the debates. Here are five options for where to watch tonight’s Q&A and interact with others watching.
Read more

Can (And Should) Journalists Stay Purely Objective?

Roland Martin doesn’t think so.

“The idea of being objective is a ridiculous one. Let’s just be honest,” he said in Mediabistro’s latest So What Do You Do? interview. ”Everybody — I don’t care who you are — you have a viewpoint on something and on an issue. The difference is whether you chose to say something publicly, whether you chose to advance it… a whole different deal.”

The TV vet spoke of his decision to wear a hoodie in support of Trayvon Martin while hosting Washington Watch on TV One as an example. “I chose to wear the hoodie, because it was important beyond just the Trayvon Martin issue but to call attention to the issue of racial profiling,” he said.

Read more in So What Do You Do, Roland Martin, CNN Contributor and Host of TV One’s Washington Watch?

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