GalleyCat FishbowlNY FishbowlDC UnBeige MediaJobsDaily SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser

Posts Tagged ‘CNN’

Tips to integrate hashtags into daily news coverage

I may be dating myself here, but I remember when Twitter didn’t automatically link @usernames and when #hashtag was a workaround to make disjointed streams of updates easier to find in their clunky search engine.

Well, Twitter has done a good job of integrating those ideas of its users to make the service what it is today. Why shouldn’t news organizations do the same and take the best ideas from their readers and viewers? One great way to gather their feedback and ideas is to integrate hashtags into your coverage. Here’s a few tips on doing that:

1. Have a standard hashtag for your news organization’s daily coverage. It could be #nyt or #cnntv or it could #[city]news or whatever it is (shorter is better) that is easy to remember and relatively easy for Twitter users to identify. Make sure it’s not already in use by someone else — unless they’re talking about your content. Don’t re-invent the wheel: If your community is already using a hashtag to link to your work, latch on and adopt it! Refer to this often in on air, in print and online so people start to associate that hashtag with your brand and your content. Encourage readers to use this tag when they mention your stories or when they have reaction to, questions about or tips for your coverage. Ask your reporters and staff to include the tag on their updates. That way, there is one stream of information you can send readers to for on-going updates without having to follow dozens or more accounts. The top news should make it there, and user story suggestions get that tag. Read more

Kennesaw State University’s Center for Sustainable Journalism

Kennesaw State University's Center for Sustainable Journalism

    While there are several universities across the country with active journalism departments, Kennesaw State University offers something a little different when it comes to educating not just their students, but to the public as well. Imagine a center that upholds the journalistic ideals of ethics, responsibility, and an unbiased objective, but also fosters civic engagement and collective action. This is Kennesaw State University’s Center for Sustainable Journalism. 

    Founded in 2009, The Center for Sustainable Journalism is the brainchild of Leonard Witt, Robert D. Fowler Distinguished Chair in Communication at Kennesaw State University. According to a 2009 interview with KSU Civic and Citizen Journalism Interest Group chair in the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Nikhil Moro, Witt said that the Center for Sustainable Journalism will work on two levels: the applied/practical, and the academic.

    1. The Center will be an incubator, economic engine and nurturer of new, sustainable models for high quality, ethically sound journalism. The goal will be to produce projects that will be spun off into stand-alone nonprofit or for-profit entities.

    2. The Center will be part of Kennesaw State University where it will reflect the university’s educational mission of teaching, mentoring, coaching, service and applied research in a global environment. That includes working with undergraduates, developing new courses, building a graduate program and producing bodies of research and evaluative tools related to the projects developed and to applied media innovation and information economics in general.

    The Center currently operates from a $1.5 million endowment by the Harnisch Foundation. Building upon the Foundation’s principles of sustainable social change and innovation in journalism, the Center plans to “test a stream of journalism projects that aim to break the stranglehold of traditional media,” according to the Atlanta Business Chronicle. One way the Center does this is through three annual conferences in the metro Atlanta area: The Social Media Integration Conference, Media Law in the Digital Age, and SoCon. SoCon is particularly popular with Atlanta journalists, drawing reporters from local and regional news outlets, as well as news executives such as CNN‘s Victor Hernandez. (Click here for highlights from Hernandez’s keynote address at SoCon in 2011.)

    Find out more about The Center for Sustainable Journalism at sustainablejournalism.org. You can also follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Nostalgia: 11 Retro News Website Homepages

Inspired by a recent Facebook album posted by Jim Brady, the former washingtonpost.com executive editor and TBD general manager, here are a couple of old homepages from news sites we know well. Any notable omission is due to the Wayback Machine not being able to crawl the site.

washingtonpost.com: June 19, 1996

Read more

Journalism, Social Media and PR: An Interview with Romey Louangvilay

Romey Louangvilay, senior account executive for digital and social media, Euro RSCG Worldwide PRThe context of social media in journalism today cannot be ignored. Several mainstream media organizations such as The Guardian, Slate, and The New York Times have realized this, and are using social media to tap into their audiences and deliver breaking news while maintaining an active and engaged audience. This has started to happen across the media spectrum, particularly in public relations.

Recently, I had the chance to talk with Romey Louangvilay, senior account executive for digital and social media at Euro RSCG Worldwide PR. Romey’s work with high profile brands involves an interesting mix of traditional journalism, public relations, and social media. In this interview, Romey explains how technology and social media play a pivotal role in the accessibility of news and information to the general public.

Read more

Meet ‘Producer Matthew’ Keys: Aggregation Journalist

Uprising in Egypt. Earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Missile strikes in Libya.

Major news has broken in every corner of the world during the past few weeks. In that time, Matthew Keys has proven himself to be a must follow for the latest from these hot spots.

Keys, 24, is a new style aggregation journalist. From his home in Sacramento, Calif., Keys even altered his sleep schedule so he can be awake to bring the latest developments from Japan.

“What my audience is looking for is somebody who, in a time of crisis, or in a time of breaking news, will just get to the facts,” he said.

Better known as Producer Matthew, Keys worked until October as a Web producer at KTXL, Sacramento’s Fox affiliate and is now unemployed. He considers himself an early adopter to social media, joining Twitter in February 2007. The service arguably began getting mainstream attention during that March’s South by Southwest Interactive Conference.

Keys still considers himself a journalist. Why? Everything he tweets or retweets he ensures comes from a credible source, or it is something he could verify.

“About 90 percent of the information I put out comes from a media source that I can verify with them,” he said.

Keys relies on reporting from global wire services like Reuters and Agence France-Presse, as well as local news services. For information from Japan, Keys has aggregated information from NHK and TBS.

“This is information that I’m putting out for my audience but it’s really coming from a third party,” he said.

While Keys agrees that Twitter is an excellent way to get news, he dismisses the notion that it will become a police scanner.

“Most people can listen to a police scanner and know that about 100 percent of the information that they’re getting from the scanner is going to be accurate, because it’s coming from law enforcement sources,” he said. “If you’re following someone in law enforcement on Twitter, absolutely. But you could also be following an account — like the Steve Jobs account — and if you’re new to Twitter, you’re not gonna know that Steve Jobs doesn’t have a Twitter account.”

“I don’t think it’s ever going to be the main source of news,” he said.

Keys also maintains an active Tumblr presence.

“The use that I have for Tumblr is for photos — a lot of people on Tumblr like photos,” he said. “They’re very visual. They don’t necessarily like to read a lot. They like video. They like audio. It’s very multimedia rich.”

Keys says being a citizen journalist has helped his reputation more than working at KTXL.

“I’ve made friends at ABC, at CNN, CBS, and a lot of the stuff I put out on Twitter … they’re now wanting to use that stuff,” he said. “That never happened when I worked at Fox.”

Follow “Producer Matthew” Keys on Twitter at @ProducerMatthew and on Tumblr at http://producermatthew.com.

<< PREVIOUS PAGE