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Posts Tagged ‘columbia university’

Columbia Daily Spectator Might Cut Back on Print Newspaper

The Columbia Daily Spectator  has been printing since 1877.

The Columbia Daily Spectator has been printing since 1877.

The Columbia Daily Spectator may become the first Ivy League university to do away with a daily, student-run print newspaper.

Based in the Harlem Morningside Heights neighborhood, the staff of the Spectator, established in 1877, says it plans to cut back to weekly papers. Editor-in-chief Abby Abrams told Capital New York‘s Peter Sterne that the new printing schedule would “allow all our writers and editors to produce the best content possible.”

Although the decision must be officially approved by the Spec‘s 11-member board, it can’t be argued that the paper’s print product lost money for the first time this year. Still, despite the well-known difficulties print publishers have with generating revenue, Abrams told Capital that reducing print output isn’t based on desperation.

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Mediabistro Course

Memoir Writing

Memoir WritingStarting July 16, learn how to tell and sell the story of your life! Taught by a published memoir writer, Wendy Dale will teach you how to create a story around a marketable premise, write a memoir with solid structure, sell you memoir before you've finished writing it and more! Register now! 

Watch Industry Pros Discuss the Future of Digital Longform Friday

logoComing up Friday, Dec. 6, several heavy hitters in the world of longform digital publishing will make appearances at Columbia University’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism to discuss the future of longer narratives online. Interested journalists can also watch a livestream of the event.

David Remnick of The New Yorker is on the bill at Friday’s one-day conference “The Future of Digital Longform” in Manhattan, as well as professionals from nonprofit investigative journalism effort ProPublica, science journalism venture Matter, the crowdfunded Narratively, Longform and The Atavist.

The event was planned for a couple reasons: 1) We’re smack dab in the middle of a really interesting movement in digital storytelling. Some call it a renaissance, even, and it’s clear that a new phenomenon has surfaced; as the Tow Center notes, narratives are being weaved together through multimedia, moving comics and powerful data instead of being one-dimensional. And, 2) Tow Center fellow Anna Hiatt, also of The Big Roundtable, which I’ve written about for the blog), is finished with her research about digital longform journalism, which is part of an ongoing look at the definitions and challenges of longer online news.

Over the course of the day, several important questions like “Just because we can design another “Snow Fall,” should we?” and, considering the fairly recent influx of startups for digital storytelling, the toughest question — “How do we pay writers?” — will be posed and pondered.

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5 Journalism Panels at SXSW Interactive 2012

SXSW Interactive 2012You may remember our post from back in August which featured fifteen journalism-related panels which were up for voting for inclusion into the 2012 SXSW schedule. Earlier this week, SXSW announced their 2012 schedule which includes over 5,000 events in the conference’s film, interactive and music tracks. Some events are still TBA, but the schedule will be updated the closer it moves to the conference’s opening date of March 9, 2012.

Here are just a few of the confirmed panels which should be of interest to journalists. This is a random sample of the entire schedule; you can search the full list of panels on the 2012 SXSW Schedule page.

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Apply Today for the Spencer Education Journalism Fellowship

Spencer Fellows Logo

If you are a journalist, an educator, or a researcher who wants to work on projects about the American education system, then you should check out the Spencer Education Journalism Fellowship from the Columbia Journalism School. This fellowship is dedicated to supporting long-form journalism that deepens and enhances the public’s understanding of the American education system, according to the Spencer Fellows website.

“The fellowship is designed to elevate the level of education reporting by giving writers the time and resources they so desperately need in today’s environment of tight deadlines and space limitations to produce a long-form work of lasting value that will trigger a national conversation on the status of education in America,” said LynNell Hancock, the program’s curriculum director.

The Columbia Journalism School has granted these particular fellowships since 2008, and Spencer Fellows have gone on to produce groundbreaking journalism on the American education system, such as Alexander Russo’s novel Stray Dogs, Saints and Saviors: Fighting for the Soul of America’s Toughest High School and Nancy Solomon’s radio documentary “Mind the Gap: Why Good Schools are Failing Black Students”, a 2010 Peabody Award winner.

Spencer Fellows will spend the upcoming academic year at Columbia University studying with other scholars and with mentors in the Journalism School. Three fellowships will be awarded, each with an annual stipend of $75,000 and a modest travel expense account. The program is highly competitive, and the deadline for applications is January 31, 2012. Successful applicants will be notified by April 5.

For more information about the program, and to apply for the Spencer Education Journalism Fellowship, visit the Spencer Fellows website at http://spencer.jrn.columbia.edu.

Independent Journalism: An Interview with Donovan X. Ramsey

Independent Journalist Donovan X. RamseyToday’s early-career journalists have more tools than ever at their disposal to create stories and report the news. Whether it’s audio, video, or even the classic long form journalism we know and love, being able to manage the current journalistic terrain while including digital resources is a must. Donovan X. Ramsey is one of several new faces in the world of journalism who are beginning to make their mark by combining the standards of traditional journalism with current technology to tell compelling stories. I had a chance to sit down with Donovan recently and discuss his thoughts on journalism and new media, and much more.

Maurice Cherry: Tell our 10,000 Words audience a little about what you do.

Donovan X. Ramsey: I’m an independent journalist but like many young professionals, I’m also freelancing wherever my skills take me. With the journalism industry still scraping to find a viable business model, many of us looking to break into the industry are applying our skills to some unconventional work. Aside from contributing to outlets like The Atlanta Post, TheFreshXpress, Creative Loafing Atlanta and The Next Great Generation, I have coordinated press and marketing for a number of non-profit organizations. This coming fall, I will be pursuing master’s work at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism with a specialization in magazine journalism. My passion is for long-form writing. I think sound, ethical journalism can change the world so I’m headed to the center of it all in hopes of doing so.

MC: How do you think the current digital landscape affects how journalism and reporting works?

DXR: I wrote a piece for my blog about the future of journalism recently titled “Beyond The Facts, Ma’am”. No one has a crystal ball on this issue, but I certainly do not think that traditional journalism is a dying industry. It has just changed with the times, and given time, it will continue to change. Reports have shown that more people are getting their news from the Internet in lieu of newspapers and radio.  That makes sense to me. The Internet is a very agile medium, so I’d venture to say that reporters cannot possibly get in front of outlets like Twitter in the race to get the story first. We can see that with the case of Osama bin Laden’s death. What journalists can do is get it right and tell the story the best.  Quality is what we are best at and the need for quality is now more pressing than ever.

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