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Posts Tagged ‘Craig Kanalley’

Video: The Impact Of Twitter On Journalism

PBS Arts Off Book put out this interesting, short video this week with some thoughts from a few leading minds in the digital journalism sphere (including Mark Luckie, the 10,000 Words founder and current manager of journalism and news at Twitter). The subject is all about how Twitter has impacted journalism and journalists’ role in using the service to source news and be a source of news. I wanted to pass it on because some of the points the speakers (Luckie, Jeff Jarvis, Craig Kanalley and Chris Anderson) brought up were important to think over, including the role of journalists as the filter for Tweets/breaking news and also the importance of realizing a lot of sources and people aren’t on Twitter or Facebook. Anyway, it’s only about 5 minutes long. Watch it.

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Storify Launches iPad App To Bring Storytelling To Your Fingertips

Storify, the popular drag-and-drop storytelling tool, is coming to an iPad near you in the form of a brand new, free app, the company announced today. The iPad application makes Storify available on mobile devices for the first time.

“Users have asked for it for a long time,” Jeff Elder, Storify’s marketing director, told me via email. “This is a storytelling app, letting you create content on the iPad as never before.”

Just like the Storify website, the app lets users curate content from Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, and other social media sites. There are two main differences: Users can tweet directly from the app and it is also touch-enabled, allowing content to be moved with just the touch of a finger.

“Whether you’re at a conference or at home, you can mix social streams to create simple, beautiful stories to share and remember the moments in life that matter,” Xavier Damman, Storify co-founder and CEO, said in a press release. “You now have storytelling at your fingertips.” Read more

What Do You Think Is Storify’s Big News?

In case you haven’t heard, Storify is set to reveal some really big news tonight at midnight PST.

What’s your prediction? Will the announcement be an acquisition? Or maybe a big new hire?

NBC News’ Craig Kanalley is curating a lot of the speculation in this Storify. Want to be a part of the story? Tweet your guess with the hashtag #Feb22.

Due to technical difficulties, the Storify won’t embed in WordPress.

The Facebook Subscribe Button Launches

UPDATE: As of Thursday afternoon, the button has launched.

You can subscribe to my updates by clicking this button:

Regular readers of this blog know that I’m a fan of Facebook’s relatively new subscribe feature — which allows non-friends to follow your public Facebook updates — but with a caveat.

Unless you’re world famous or algorithmically make it onto Facebook’s suggested users list, it’s near impossible to grow your Facebook following. While one’s Twitter following can be grown by the help of the community around you — by mentions, follow Fridays and the like — that kind of behavior, while possible on Facebook, is not particularly prevalent there.

So in an effort to change that, a Facebook executive on Wednesday announced that the company will be launching a subscribe button that will be embeddable on websites, similar to  Twitter’s follow buttons. It’s long overdue, since Facebook fan pages have had embeddable “like” button functionality for some time. Read more

Tool of the Day: Cuttings.me

Gone are the days when a reporter printed out his or her clips and snail-mailed them to a hiring editor or human resources. In fact, for many young job seekers, this is a scenario they have never encountered and probably never will. Now, almost every single job posting asks applicants to apply online and include links to their work.

If you’re ahead of the game, you already have a blog or website where you collect and showcase links to your best work, Twitter account, LinkedIn, etc. (One of my personal favorites is the website of Craig Kanalley, the new social media editor at NBC News.)

Traditionally, there’s two ways of displaying your articles. One is to make a page on your site, normally called “Clips” or something similar, and fill it with links of your best work. (This is done by copying and pasting the headline of your story and then hyperlinking it.) The second way is to direct readers to an online author archive based at your news organization that shows all the stories you’ve written for that site.

What’s frustrating about both tactics is that they aren’t particularly visually appealing.

Enter Cuttings.me, a new service that provides journalists with a free, online platform to showcase their work. The site launched in October and was created by travel journalist Nicholas Holmes to fill the void he found when he tried to share and upload his work online. Read more

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