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Posts Tagged ‘crowdfunding’

A New Crowdfunding Platform Lets You Host and Customize Your Project

These days, it’s almost a shock whenever startups, no matter their goal, aren’t somehow associated with a crowdfunding website.

Between Indiegogo, Crowdfunder, Kickstarter and others, various journalism projects and tech companies would have never materialized if it weren’t for the generosity of others and online platforms that have made it fairly foolproof to contribute and receive donations.

But as it turns out, Crowdtilt, a Web-based crowdsourcing effort, wants to make it even easier for people (and by people I mean journalists) to manage the funds they raise for their endeavors.

Crowdtilt has launched a public version of its spinoff Crowdhoster, a site that allows users to host and easily manage their own campaigns.

Read more

Journos, Meet TubeStart: Subscription Based Crowdfunding

There are lots of reasons that crowdfunding makes sense to journalists. And there are lots of ways to go about it. Alas, there are also drawbacks to what’s become the standard on platforms like Indiegogo or Kickstarter. Mainly it’s the whole deadline, all-or nothing approach to the major platforms. It’s fun and splashy and intense, but it’s also stressful and often just as much work to run a campaign to raise money for a project than it is to actually complete the project.

That’s why Josef Holm and Claude Shires have created TubeStart, a YouTube centric crowdfunding platform. It makes sense for two reasons.

The first is that the audience is there, waiting to be tapped. Instead of making users come to you, you can reach the bazillion (that’s a technical term) users that already viewing content on YouTube.

And you can monetize that content in a sustainable way. That’s the second part. What makes TubeStart unique is that you can raise funds with a subscription model. Holm says, that “fans can subscribe to over many mnths as opposed to running a month long campaign with the stress of making the goal. You can focus on finding funding to sustain your production costs.”

That’s interesting. The hardest thing about making the foray into video content is that it’s an added expense, and it’s still difficult to make it profitable. A local news organization could create daily news shows and ask users to donate, say, $1 a month for the privelage of viewing — and maybe some exclusive bonus content or other perk. This way, your content is paid for, while still remaining free for the general public, and you can make a few cents with Adsense to boot.

The platform launches August 20 and if you sign up now, TubeStart will waive the platform fees.  

Gawker’s Crackstarter Campaign is Over

Gawker’s Rob Ford Crackstarter campaign is officially over. When it first started, we wondered here why readers should pay to see in the first place. Like all things drug related, the campaign took a nose-dive when the video became randomly unavailable.

The cash is now being divvied up, as promised, to Canadian charities that John Cook has deemed worthy. Apart from the ethics of making readers pay for source material, if you’re thinking about running a crowdfunding campaign for anything, you should remember to estimate fees into your goal:

 

The total take from Crackstarter was $201,199. Indiegogo, the service that hosted the campaign, withheld $8,047.96 in fees. PayPal, which processed the payments, withheld $8,368.43. That left the Crackstarter with a net take of $184,782.61, which has been held in a non-interest bearing account since PayPal released the money to us.

That’s over $16,000 that Indiegogo and PayPal pocketed jsut because Gawker readers are crazy enough to want to watch a mayor smoking crack. And they say there’s no money in journalism these days.

Image c/o Gawker

Get Advice from the National Crowdfunding Association Executive Director

Trying to use crowdfunding sites to launch your next journalism project?

National Crowdfunding Association executive director David Marlett will lead a short Crowdfunding for Media webcast with Mediabistro. Follow this link to register:

In this webcast, David Marlett, executive director of the National Crowdfunding Association, will use examples from the audience to explain how just about any project can be successfully crowdfunded. David will also outline how upcoming legal changes will allow for equity crowdfunding and Reg D/accredited investor crowdfunding. You’ll learn how to: Choose the right platform and reach out to investors for your potential project. Raise the right amount of money and provide appropriate investor rewards. Identify entrepreneurs whose businesses might make good investments. Understand upcoming legal changes that will affect crowdfunding.

Why Was Planet Money’s Kickstarter Campaign So Successful?

At the time of this writing, NPR’s Planet Money has raised $524,286 on Kickstarter. The project has a day left, and is a pretty remarkable feat considering the sum is more than 10 times their initial goal of $50,000. So how did they do it? Read more

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