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Posts Tagged ‘digital revenue’

How Newsrooms Can Cash In Through Events, According to the American Press Institute

eventsrevenueAs many struggling newsrooms — or publications who are at least in a stage of transition — keep thinking of ways to diversify their revenue streams, live events have become a welcome addition to the frameworks of many media companies.

When done right, event production can be a fantastic way to increase audience engagement with current readers, attract and inform new readers and promote the mission and vision of your publication.

And thanks to a recently-published “Strategy Study” produced by the American Press Institute (API), newsroom leaders now have another resource to refer to when pursuing event production.

Using the nonprofit, nonpartisan digitally-native publication The Texas Tribune as inspiration for a successful revenue model (in 2013, the Trib generated more than $1 million from events), the API spent eight months interviewing 19 publishers about how they made journalism events a sustainable, vital asset to their organizations, and to the community around them.

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What Is Slate Premium? The Publisher’s New Method For Monetization

slate-premium1Slate is dipping its toe in the membership pool.

Digital publishers keep experimenting with different methods of monetization, whether through metered paywalls, crowdsourcing, events or subscriptions, to see which one’s the answer to the pressing and increasingly complicated revenue question.

In a blog post Monday, Slate Editor David Plotz introduced Slate Plus, a membership option for the most passionate Slate fans. For those who pay $5 monthly or $50 a year, Plotz said readers “who support [Slate] journalism and want a closer connection to it” get perks like access to Slate writers through Slate Plus member-only discussions, early viewing of certain articles, ad-free podcasts, 30 percent off live events, single page articles rather than pesky pagination and special commenting privileges.

But don’t worry — this is not a paywall. As Plotz noted, all the free stuff on Slate will stay free. The membership fee just buys you extras, a benefit package they’ll be adding to over time. This type of model has been described as a “reverse paywall,” one that GigaOm’s Mathew Ingram has said is a good way to reward loyal readers rather than penalizing them.

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Haters Will Hate: Why Shouldn’t Ezra Klein Start His Own Media Company?

ezraklein1If I were friends with Ezra Klein, I would tell him to keep his chin up this week. As you might have read, he’s leaving the Post and Wonkblog, effective immediately, to start his own media venture, after the Post decided they wouldn’t be interested in investing a reported $10 million and hiring three dozen people to help him do it.

The general consensus is that Klein is going to need more luck than funding to make this work.

 

It’s not going to be easy — as many have pointed out — relying on advertising and his brand won’t be enough. John McDermott over at Digiday points out that Re/Code’s Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg need to charge thousands of dollars for conference tickets to make it work, Grantland has ESPN’s big name to draw national brands, Glenn Greenwald has a billionaire backer and Andrew Sullivan is, well, Andrew Sullivan. Read more

RealMatch: Innovation in the Classifieds Section

The golden age of newspapers all ended with Craigslist and Monster.com, right? When job boards left their rightful place in the back of the publications. Interestingly enough, those same job boards are starting to come back and create revenue streams for content publishers.

RealMatch has changed the game of recruitment and founder Gal Almog is leading the charge. The company has revolutionized the model of employers and job seekers posting and clicking through gigs on various sites with their Real-Time Job Matching technology. It’s like a dating site for recruitment, says Almog. A user uploads a resume and specifies what they’re looking for and when a job opens up, the technology alerts you. Employers and advertisers post jobs on one site and it gets distributed through RealMatch’s network. “We do all the heavy lifting,” as Almog puts it.

So what does this have to do with newspapers? Everything. Read more

Roundup: WaPo’s digital revenue drops; Globe’s online audience grows; NYT lays off employees

Consider this today’s State of the Newspaper roundup as a few interesting numbers and tidbits  about The Washington Post, The Boston Globe and The New York Times are making the rounds.

WaPo’s digital revenue declined in Q1

According to PaidContent, The Washington Post newspaper division — which includes WaPo and Slate — lost $22.6 million for the first quarter. In the same quarter last year, they lost $12.8 million. Of that loss for 2012, here’s the breakdown for digital loss:

  • Digital revenue slipped 7 percent
  • online display ad revenue dropped 11 percent year over year
  • Online classified ad revenue was down 1 percent Read more

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