GalleyCat FishbowlNY FishbowlDC UnBeige MediaJobsDaily SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser

Posts Tagged ‘digital revenue’

What Is Slate Premium? The Publisher’s New Method For Monetization

slate-premium1Slate is dipping its toe in the membership pool.

Digital publishers keep experimenting with different methods of monetization, whether through metered paywalls, crowdsourcing, events or subscriptions, to see which one’s the answer to the pressing and increasingly complicated revenue question.

In a blog post Monday, Slate Editor David Plotz introduced Slate Plus, a membership option for the most passionate Slate fans. For those who pay $5 monthly or $50 a year, Plotz said readers “who support [Slate] journalism and want a closer connection to it” get perks like access to Slate writers through Slate Plus member-only discussions, early viewing of certain articles, ad-free podcasts, 30 percent off live events, single page articles rather than pesky pagination and special commenting privileges.

But don’t worry — this is not a paywall. As Plotz noted, all the free stuff on Slate will stay free. The membership fee just buys you extras, a benefit package they’ll be adding to over time. This type of model has been described as a “reverse paywall,” one that GigaOm’s Mathew Ingram has said is a good way to reward loyal readers rather than penalizing them.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

Haters Will Hate: Why Shouldn’t Ezra Klein Start His Own Media Company?

ezraklein1If I were friends with Ezra Klein, I would tell him to keep his chin up this week. As you might have read, he’s leaving the Post and Wonkblog, effective immediately, to start his own media venture, after the Post decided they wouldn’t be interested in investing a reported $10 million and hiring three dozen people to help him do it.

The general consensus is that Klein is going to need more luck than funding to make this work.

 

It’s not going to be easy — as many have pointed out — relying on advertising and his brand won’t be enough. John McDermott over at Digiday points out that Re/Code’s Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg need to charge thousands of dollars for conference tickets to make it work, Grantland has ESPN’s big name to draw national brands, Glenn Greenwald has a billionaire backer and Andrew Sullivan is, well, Andrew Sullivan. Read more

RealMatch: Innovation in the Classifieds Section

The golden age of newspapers all ended with Craigslist and Monster.com, right? When job boards left their rightful place in the back of the publications. Interestingly enough, those same job boards are starting to come back and create revenue streams for content publishers.

RealMatch has changed the game of recruitment and founder Gal Almog is leading the charge. The company has revolutionized the model of employers and job seekers posting and clicking through gigs on various sites with their Real-Time Job Matching technology. It’s like a dating site for recruitment, says Almog. A user uploads a resume and specifies what they’re looking for and when a job opens up, the technology alerts you. Employers and advertisers post jobs on one site and it gets distributed through RealMatch’s network. “We do all the heavy lifting,” as Almog puts it.

So what does this have to do with newspapers? Everything. Read more

Roundup: WaPo’s digital revenue drops; Globe’s online audience grows; NYT lays off employees

Consider this today’s State of the Newspaper roundup as a few interesting numbers and tidbits  about The Washington Post, The Boston Globe and The New York Times are making the rounds.

WaPo’s digital revenue declined in Q1

According to PaidContent, The Washington Post newspaper division — which includes WaPo and Slate — lost $22.6 million for the first quarter. In the same quarter last year, they lost $12.8 million. Of that loss for 2012, here’s the breakdown for digital loss:

  • Digital revenue slipped 7 percent
  • online display ad revenue dropped 11 percent year over year
  • Online classified ad revenue was down 1 percent Read more

PEW Study Asks Whether Facebook Would Buy The Washington Post

The big struggle facing this era of journalism is how to keep it profitable online. Tech companies have figured it out, though — according to the PEW Research Center, five technology companies in 2011 accounted for 68 percent of all online ad revenue, not including Amazon and Apple , whose profits come mostly from downloads and devices. So how can newspapers break into the online ad revenue market?

Could we be headed to a world where Facebook buys a legacy media company like The Washington Post? It’s a question pondered in a study from PEW’s State of the Media report, which says that Facebook is expected to account for one out of every five digital display ads sold by 2015.

Examples of these kinds of partnerships are already popping up, the study says, citing the following relationships:

  1. YouTube is funding Reuters to produce original news shows.
  2. Yahoo signed a content partnership with ABC News for video content.
  3. AOL purchased The Huffington Post.
  4. Facebook, with launch of the social reader, has already formed partnerships with The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and The Guardian.
  5. Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes purchased the 98-year-old New Republic magazine

Source: stateofthemedia.org | Via: The Wrap

That said, the study also found that while Facebook and Twitter dominate the intersection of social sharing and news, social media are not yet a strong driver to news. The study found that 9 percent of digital news consumers “very often” follow news recommendations from social media, while more than a third of all consumers go directly to various news sites and apps.  A majority of survey-takers, 56 percent, said that while they often find news on Facebook, it’s usually big enough news that they would have found it elsewhere — a hint that maybe Facebook isn’t vital to the discovery of news.

Readers are also growing increasingly aware of privacy issues online, which could make a hypothetical Facebook-Washington Post acquisition even trickier. According to the PEW study, “roughly two-thirds of the Internet population is uneasy with targeted advertising and search engines tracking their behavior.” This is at the heart of what Facebook does.

What do you think — could you see a future where WaPo is owned by a tech company like Facebook?  Read other key findings and major trends from the PEW report →