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Posts Tagged ‘freelancers’

Freelance Journos: Would You Do A Little Content Marketing?

CONTENTRUNNER LOGOThe one thing every journalist knows (apart from how to get a source to return a call just before a deadline) is that we also have to be experts in something besides getting a good story. Business news. Sports. Tech. National security.

That’s why Content Runner’s new “Offerings” feature caught my eye. Content Runner specializes in matching writers up with people who need content. Yes, when I hear “content marketing,” I cringe a little bit, too. It can feel like making a deal with the devil. Unless that devil is paying you some extra cash. There’s no reason why working journos — especially freelancers — shouldn’t be able to make a little on the side.

It’s not just pennies per word either. Co-founder Chad Fisher explained to me that when they launched seven months ago, they attracted a lot of “users” looking for writers, but paying just pennies. “It was a race to the bottom, price wise. Read more

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Freelance Editing

Freelance EditingStarting August 6, learn how to build a thriving career as a creative professional! In this course, you'll learn the best practices for managing a freelance career, such as, how to establish your online presence, pitch to clients, manage your finances and solicit referrals and testimonials. Register now! 

Ebyline Launches Pitch Board to Better Connect Seasoned Freelancers and Publishers

photoIt can be hard out there for a freelancer. The avalanche of emails, stiff competition, low pay and ignored invoices all make it a real challenge.

That’s why Ebyline, a conduit between digital publishers and writers, works to connect those are looking for work and those who need work done and is now going one step further with its new Pitch Board.

Ebyline’s Pitch Board allows hiring news organizations to post ads for $50 (this buys your project 30 days on the board), promising guaranteed responses from interested freelancers within 48 hours. Because of the exclusivity of Ebyline (just about 25 percent of those who apply for the stamp of Ebyline approval make the cut), only those who have been declared “qualified” freelancers are able to respond to job postings. According to the company, there are more than 2,000 people currently in the freelancer bank, and they’ve all been screened and approved by Ebyline’s in-house editorial staff. To give you an idea of their clientele, the Los Angeles Times and the AP are among those seeking freelance talent.

Read more

Ebyline Launches WordPress Plugin To Pay Freelancers

ebylineEbyline, a platform that connects publishers and freelancers, has recently added a WordPress plug-in to their built in payment system.

Allen Narcisse, co-founder and COO, explains how simple it is:

The idea is that you use WordPress because you want to manage your CMS and all of your authors are organized within WordPress. It brings some of the best part of our services into it. Either the author or an admin can authorize the payment and the payment just goes to the freelancer. And then by going into our platform later, you can get a bigger picture of what you’ve spent over time.  Read more

Push Notifications for Everyone: App.net Launches ‘Broadcast’

appnet alertsYou don’t have to make your own app or hire an editor to handle push notification headlines for it anymore. App.net, the social networking and micro-blogging site, launches a new service, Broadcast, today, allowing anyone — from the freelance blogger to web magazine mogul — to send out their own push notifications.

All you have to do is download the app, released today on both Android and iOS markets, set up your ‘broadcast channel,’ and publish your notification. On the consumer side, they’ll have to sign up, too. And subscribe to you. But CEO Dalton Caldwell doesn’t see it as a hassle: Read more

How to Get a Publication to Pay You Without Going to Small Claims Court

chess-knightsThis week we wrote about how journalists should be paid in the digital environment. Journalists being paid is a hot issue, especially since a lot of times, we’re asked to write for free or for exposure. That, too, is a loaded issue — sometimes it might be worth it, or it never, ever is.

And sometimes, we agree to do work for payment and never receive it. This is a classic freelancer dilemma and while most of you are, hopefully, sitting in newsrooms with a salary and benefits package and paid sick days, you never know when the shoe is going to drop and you need to pick up some work. Or, as is common in the digital environment, your contract allows you to write other sites every now and again, as long as you’re not competing with yourself.

Recently, I made a rookie mistake by taking on work for a start-up magazine. The work kept coming and the pay was in line with my experience and time. I won’t disclose the name of the publication (just to say it wasn’t this one), since the affair is — almost — concluded. But I did learn some lessons. Not about how to prevent this from happening again — there were contracts and tax information and all the legalese you can dream up.

So, short of a lawyer, who wouldn’t have been worth the sort-of small change I was owed,  and one step away from small claims court, here’s how I won my war.

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