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Posts Tagged ‘infographic’

Top 25 Most Popular Apps For Freelancers

When it comes to software and apps to help them work, it’s no surprise freelancers like free apps. But here’s another non-surprise from a recent survey of about 100 freelancers conducted by BestVendor: They also love cloud computing. Most of the top 25 most popular apps from that survey were a combination of both.

Check out BestVendor's infographic to learn more about the survey and see a few of their respondents' also-rans that didn't make the main list this time. Click the image to see the full size version.

In its survey due to be released Thursday, the New York-based start-up site aimed at connecting users with useful apps and software found not one of the top 25 most popular apps cited by the freelancers was a desktop-only program. Some of them have desktop components, but most were cloud-based apps or sites.

 

So what were the pack leaders? Well, if this were the Olympics, let’s just say Google would be the medal leader in this event, with seven of the top 25 apps the freelancers cited — more than a quarter of the list, including two of the top three. Yet, it didn’t take the No. 1 spot: File sharing and backup service Dropbox bested the big G for that honor.

Beyond file storage and email, several of the tools were directly related to the business aspects of working as a freelancer, with software to help manage projects, invoices, billing and budgeting.

To be fair, the demographics of the relatively small sample of freelancers surveyed about what software and apps they use to manage their work was skewed a bit: 44 percent worked in technology and digital media according to BestVendor. Also, primarily they were based in the U.S. and Europe. But this is still an interesting list of ideas for freelancers looking to add primarily free tools to their tool box.

In rank order, the 25 most popular freelancer tools are:
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Infographic: How Social Media Wins At Breaking News

Here’s some lunch-time fodder to consider. How reliant are you on social media to keep up on the latest news? How has this changed for you in the past decade?

To put this in perspective, think about this:

  • On September 11, 2001, how did you hear about the World Trade Center attacks? For those in New York and D.C., how did you connect with your loved ones to let them know you were OK? For everyone else, how did you show your support? Chances are you watched the towers fall on TV, read the full story in the next edition of the newspaper and grabbed a copy of a news weekly that week, which you perhaps hung on to as a moment in history. Likely, as well, you talked to your family and friends in person or over the phone if you could get through. It definitely wasn’t via Twitter of Facebook, neither had been invented yet.
  • On May 1, 2011, how did you hear about the death of Osama Bin Laden? (Or before that, about President Barack Obama’s planned press conference announcing the death?) Chances are good you heard about it on Twitter or Facebook, or from someone who heard about it from some sort of social media.
  • While both the old and new media clearly have a role in telling news stories (and especially the stories behind the news) today, social media has clearly become the way to find and share breaking news for a large portion of the population. This infographic from Schools.com uses info from a variety of sources, including the Pew Research Center’s recent report on “What Facebook and Twitter Mean For News“, to pretty aptly cover some of the seismic shifts taking place in the news industry, in particular how consumers receive their news.

    This graphic tips at, but doesn’t seek to explain the bigger problem: Trust. With news spreading so swiftly, it’s hard to discern fact from fascination when people eager to break news share it before verifying it. But that’s a question that needs answered another day.

    Here’s the full graphic: Read more

    Twitter’s Reaction To The State of the Union In One Compelling Infographic

    Last night, President Obama gave the 2012 State of the Union address, and Twitter users immediately took to the platform to livetweet their #SOTU reactions. Over at the Washington Post, Eric Wemple provides some interesting reasoning as to why Twitter is the perfect tool to complement live TV. His main argument is that Twitter is ideal for capturing the minutia–reaction shots, jokey asides–without interrupting the overall flow of the event. Twitter users seem to agree, considering the sheer amount of people tweeting about the event last night.

    Twitter has put together an infographic to illustrate last night’s activity on the site, including this whopping number: 766,681 users tweeted between 9:05pm and 10:40pm with a State of the Union-related hashtag. Congress jumped in on the action, too: there were 548 total tweets from congressional members during the speech.

    Check out the full infographic after the jump.

    Read more

    Infographic Overload?

    Source: Indexed

    Who doesn’t love a good infographic?

    When done well, they concisely present information in a way no narrative story could, helping you see comparison and draw conclusions you wouldn’t be able to pinpoint on your own. But when they’re done poorly, or worse unnecessarily, they muddle information for the sake of being an infographic.

    The goal of a designer is to make information more accessible and readable, whether it’s by choosing the perfect font to convey a mood, layout to draw readers through, or graph to show off data as only graphs can do. But when unprecedented amounts of data and graphics software fall into the hands of the masses, color and quantity sometimes trump care and quality.

    Grace Dobush at HOW Interactive Design is on a campaign to stop the madness. In her post, Quit it With All the Infographics Already, she points out several good reasons to think before inking an infographic, including:

       

    • Most infographics aren’t accessible for the visually impaired.
    • Most infographics aren’t search-engine optimized.
    • Those super-long infographics are practically useless on a mobile device.
    • Of all online infographics, 89% contain statistics of dubious veracity. (Err, percentage is madeup, which is sort of her point.)
    • Many infographics are just plain bad.

    That’s not to say there aren’t reasons to use graphics. There are plenty of awesome graphical stories on news sites and blogs today. 10,000 Words highlights them often. But just because you can, doesn’t mean you need to go graphic goofy.

    You should go read the rest of the post to get more background on those valid points, and to get HOW Magazine’s pointers on how to avoid falling into the infographic trap and responsibly create them.

    (The image on this post, by the way, comes from Indexed, a comic of sorts drawn on index cards and using only charts. I’m not saying the charts are bad, but I’ll admit I’ve scratched my head in confusion at a few of them.)

    An Infographic Look At Generational Media Use

    Here’s something to think about. How does your media use — everything from newspapers to radio to Facebook — compare to your parents? Your siblings? Your kids? Chances are how and when you spend time on each of these media is quite different.

    AdAge posted this interesting infographic that drives that point home with data from a study by Magid Generational Strategies on how different generations use various media throughout the day. One interesting point I noticed was in the fine print: The percentages of media use at any given time do not add up to 100 percent. That’s because there’s an awful lot of media consumption multitasking, especially among the millennials.

    Here’s the graphic:

    Media Consumption - 2011
    Created by: MBA Online

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