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Posts Tagged ‘Internet’

New Study Finds That the Internet Didn’t Kill Newspapers

moneyvortex.jpgA new study done by University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business professor Matthew Gentzkow finds that the Internet did not kill the newspaper industry. It was cellphones.

I jest. Even though it sounds like the (very) first draft of an Onion article,  it’s apparently real.  Here’s the deal: we usually say that the internet killed our old business model because of advertising revenue. Gentzkow shows that it’s a bit of a fallacy — people spend more time looking at advertisements online, too. From Booth’s release on his study:

“This perception that online ads are cheaper to buy is all about people quoting things in units that are not comparable to each other—doing apples-to-oranges comparisons,” Gentzkow says. Online ad rates are typically discussed in terms of “number of unique monthly visitors” the ad receives, while circulation numbers determine newspaper rates… By comparing the amount of time people actually see an ad, Gentzkow finds that the price of attention for similar consumers is actually higher online. In 2008, he calculates, newspapers earned $2.78 per hour of attention in print, and $3.79 per hour of attention online. By 2012, the price of attention in print had fallen to $1.57, while the price for attention online had increased to $4.24.

There’s also his findings that people were actually starting to lose interest in newspapers in the 1980′s, long before signing into AOL’s walled garden of news was a consumer habit. You can read his published paper “Trading Dollars for Dollars: The Price of Attention Online and Offline.” at the American Economic Review. Pay per view options are available for non-subscribers.

Consider my mind blown.

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Online Journalism in 1981 (VIDEO)

Above is one of my favorite videos about online journalism — a 1981 television report from KRON-TV in the San Francisco Bay Area. It shows how, through a special service, people were able to dial into servers and download the day’s newspaper.

How long does it take to download the newspaper? Well, over 2 hours (after all, the modems shown require the user to physically place a telephone handset on top of them).

It speaks of eight newspapers who had online versions available at the time: the Columbus Dispatch, The New York Times, the Virginian-Pilot & Ledger Star, The Washington Post, the San Francisco Chronicle, the San Francisco Examiner, the Los Angeles Times and the Minneapolis Star and Tribune. Read more

Bloggers Are Not Journalists Rules Portland Judge

In the ongoing debate on journalist vs. blogger, a Portland judge’s recent ruling draws a clear distinction between the two. Crystal Cox, a self-identified investigative blogger, was sued by the investment firm Obsidian Finance Group for defamation. She wrote several articles that were highly critical of the firm’s co-founder Kevin Padrick, who told OregonLive.com “The damage to me is forever. The Internet is not capable of being undone.”

U.S. District Judge Marco A. Hernandez decided that Cox is not entitled to protection under Oregon’s media shield law because she is not “affiliated with any newspaper, magazine, periodical, book, pamphlet, news service, wire service, news or feature syndicate, broadcast station or network, or cable television system.” He disagrees with her self-identification as “media,” but goes on to say that even if she were entitled protection, it would not be granted due to the case being a “civil action for defamation.”

This case highlights the gap between our slow-to-change institutions and the always-changing Internet. As Matthew Ingram at GigaOm pointed out, there are “shield laws” in 40 states, “but some have been updated to include cover newer forms of media such as blogs, and others haven’t.” Just a little bit north in Washington state, Cox would’ve been protected by an expanded shield law. Read more

How Does the Internet of 1996 Compare to 2011? [INFOGRAPHIC]

Fifteen years ago, in 1996, I was still in middle school. We had one computer (a really old Apple) in our house and logging onto AOL was by dial-up only, took at least five minutes and ended with that cheerful voice saying, “You’ve got mail!” (Anyone miss this?) The Internet has definitely changed a lot, and for the better, in a decade and a half.

For those of you interested in a visual representation of those changes, check out this wonderful infographic by Online University comparing the Internet of 1996 to today. Read more