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Posts Tagged ‘iPad apps’

5 iPad Apps Journalists Should Try For Interviews

When Apple first announced its fourth-generation iPad and iPad Mini, I’m sure many journalists out there were extremely excited for the opportunity to get their hands on these new gadgets. I know I was. But for all the functional uses the iPad provides us, I wonder how many journalists have truly incorporated it into an everyday work tool? I know I haven’t.

In terms of incorporating into an everyday work tool, I’m not referring to using it as a device for reading content, sending emails, or communicating through social media channels. I’m talking about using it in the field – whether that’s shooting video, taking photos, writing pieces on the go or using the technology for interviews. This last point is something that I’ve never used the iPad for because I often use a voice recorder or take hand notes.

So I did some digging, and asked for some suggestions, and these are five apps (listed in alphabetical order) that I think are great for handling interviews.

1. Dragon Dictation

 I’ve been pleasantly surprised by the accuracy and speed of Dragon Dictation, which transcribes voice recordings into text. According to a description of the app, “it’s up to five times faster than typing on the keyboard,” and I can note that it is pretty accurate in picking up my voice and translating that to copy. This information can then be sent via text message, email, social media platforms, and much more. The only downside of this app is that you need a Wi-Fi connection in order to do any transcribing. On the positive side, this app is free to download.

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WSJ‘s iPad Editor Tells How to Get a Job Like His

The rise of new media may be a bane for the print medium, but it certainly is a boon for the more tech-inclined. David Ho, editor of mobile, tablets and emerging technology at The Wall Street Journal is one of those folks.

He helped develop the WSJ‘s iPad app, one of the first from a major newspaper. But he also has some serious journalism chops: Ho has covered national consumer affairs for the AP and reported on telecom and terrorism for Cox Newspapers. In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? series, he gives advice to aspiring mobile editors and tells how news orgs should approach new technology.

“A lot of news skills only come with experience. I love it when folks can do Photoshop and the like, but more than any one kind of expertise, it’s important to have a general and deep technology comfort level and interest. This is all moving so fast, you have to adapt daily, hourly. It’s as much about making news decisions as it is troubleshooting tech problems. You need to be able to talk to developers as much as you talk to reporters and editors. You need a foot in each world, editorial and technology.”

For more, read So What Do You Do, David Ho, Mobile and Tablets Editor at The Wall Street Journal?

Study: iPad Owners Consume More News

A tablet device with a user's index finger resting on the touchscreen.A recent survey from the Reynolds Journalism Institute found that iPad users were more likely to consume news compared to those without iPads. Not only were iPad users across age groups more likely to go to news organizations for information—they also spent more time reading the news compared to people who do not own iPads. Eighty-four percent of iPad users like to keep up with the news on their devices, compared to 63 percent of all mobile device owners.

These numbers may not be all that surprising, but the study also found that two-thirds of those in the 18 to 34 age group spent 5 hours a week consuming content from news organizations. This rose to 7.3 hours a week for those with an iPad in this age group. Interestingly, media consumers over 55 spent less time consuming news on their devices—probably because two-thirds of them have subscriptions to news in print form. This contrasts with the younger age group, where only a quarter of them have print subscriptions. Read more

Storify Launches iPad App To Bring Storytelling To Your Fingertips

Storify, the popular drag-and-drop storytelling tool, is coming to an iPad near you in the form of a brand new, free app, the company announced today. The iPad application makes Storify available on mobile devices for the first time.

“Users have asked for it for a long time,” Jeff Elder, Storify’s marketing director, told me via email. “This is a storytelling app, letting you create content on the iPad as never before.”

Just like the Storify website, the app lets users curate content from Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, and other social media sites. There are two main differences: Users can tweet directly from the app and it is also touch-enabled, allowing content to be moved with just the touch of a finger.

“Whether you’re at a conference or at home, you can mix social streams to create simple, beautiful stories to share and remember the moments in life that matter,” Xavier Damman, Storify co-founder and CEO, said in a press release. “You now have storytelling at your fingertips.” Read more

Good Times for Long-Form Journalism?

It seems that despite the ever-quickening speeds of information travel, long-form journalism is adapting and thriving in the new media environment. Yesterday, Longform.org released its iPad app, one that doesn’t merely plop the website in app form, but tries to tailor the experience directly for the iPad user. Its design is sleek and minimal, and users can save articles with Readability, Instapaper and Read It Later.  One can subscribe to Longform.org’s most popular sources, including magazine favorites like The New Yorker, National Geographic, The Atlantic; Internet denizens The Awl and Grantland; and even fellow aggregators Longreads. Read more

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