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Posts Tagged ‘journalism education’

3 Journalism-y Things You Should Add to Your Reading List

s&sFacts of life: writers can’t be great unless they constantly write (practice makes perfect), and writers won’t be inspired to write unless they read. We should be reading everything: historical biographies, crappy fiction, beautiful prose, intricately-woven nonfiction narratives — and don’t forget, we should be reading the work of people who are smarter than us when it comes to digital innovation and journalism.

Here are just a few newer pieces of literary work I’ve been (and will be) digging into and would recommend for writers and reporters:

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Freelance Editing

Freelance EditingStarting August 6, learn how to build a thriving career as a creative professional! In this course, you'll learn the best practices for managing a freelance career, such as, how to establish your online presence, pitch to clients, manage your finances and solicit referrals and testimonials. Register now! 

9 Ways for Journalists to Continue Their Schooling While Working

So you’re a working journalist. But J-school undergrad degree under your belt or not, if you’re not actively seeking new ways to sharpen your digital skill set, you’re behind.

But, come on. Who wants to make a cross-country move for another degree?

Luckily, more and more online masters programs have popped up over the years to remedy that. If you happen to be thinking about going to school for a second (or third) time, or are just looking to take a course for fun via a non-degree track, here are some options:

  1. University of Florida Web Design and Online Communication Masters  — The curriculum consists of basic HTML and coding practices, as well as a solid basis of digital communication theory and branding. There’s also a certificate option.

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Knight Foundation: Time To Reform Journalism Education

In an open letter to America’s university presidents, The Knight Foundation and representatives from other journalism grant providers said that many journalism schools are not up to date and called on universities to recreate themselves in order to succeed.

From the letter:

Journalism funders agree that academia must be leading instead of resisting the reform effort. Deans must find ways for their schools to evolve, rather than maintain the status quo. Simply put, universities must become forceful partners in revitalizing an industry at the very core of democracy.

We also agree universities should make these changes for the betterment of students and society. Schools that favor the status quo, and thus fall behind in the digital transition, risk becoming irrelevant to both private funders and, more importantly, the students they seek to serve.

The letter was signed by Eric Newton, senior adviser of the Knight Foundation; Clark Bell, journalism program director at McCrmick Foundation; Bob Ross, president and CEO of the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation; Mike Philipps, president and CEO of the Scripps Howard Foundation; Linda Shoemaker, president of the Brett Family Foundation; and David Haas, chair of the Wyncote Foundation.

What they all have in common? They represent organizations that give grants to journalism education, and in the letter they warn that schools that do not update their curriculum will “find it difficult to raise money from foundations interested in the future of news.” A threat?

Read the full letter  here

Kennesaw State University’s Center for Sustainable Journalism

Kennesaw State University's Center for Sustainable Journalism

    While there are several universities across the country with active journalism departments, Kennesaw State University offers something a little different when it comes to educating not just their students, but to the public as well. Imagine a center that upholds the journalistic ideals of ethics, responsibility, and an unbiased objective, but also fosters civic engagement and collective action. This is Kennesaw State University’s Center for Sustainable Journalism. 

    Founded in 2009, The Center for Sustainable Journalism is the brainchild of Leonard Witt, Robert D. Fowler Distinguished Chair in Communication at Kennesaw State University. According to a 2009 interview with KSU Civic and Citizen Journalism Interest Group chair in the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Nikhil Moro, Witt said that the Center for Sustainable Journalism will work on two levels: the applied/practical, and the academic.

    1. The Center will be an incubator, economic engine and nurturer of new, sustainable models for high quality, ethically sound journalism. The goal will be to produce projects that will be spun off into stand-alone nonprofit or for-profit entities.

    2. The Center will be part of Kennesaw State University where it will reflect the university’s educational mission of teaching, mentoring, coaching, service and applied research in a global environment. That includes working with undergraduates, developing new courses, building a graduate program and producing bodies of research and evaluative tools related to the projects developed and to applied media innovation and information economics in general.

    The Center currently operates from a $1.5 million endowment by the Harnisch Foundation. Building upon the Foundation’s principles of sustainable social change and innovation in journalism, the Center plans to “test a stream of journalism projects that aim to break the stranglehold of traditional media,” according to the Atlanta Business Chronicle. One way the Center does this is through three annual conferences in the metro Atlanta area: The Social Media Integration Conference, Media Law in the Digital Age, and SoCon. SoCon is particularly popular with Atlanta journalists, drawing reporters from local and regional news outlets, as well as news executives such as CNN‘s Victor Hernandez. (Click here for highlights from Hernandez’s keynote address at SoCon in 2011.)

    Find out more about The Center for Sustainable Journalism at sustainablejournalism.org. You can also follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Sharpen Your Skills to Keep Up with the Web

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– MONA ZHANG

The days of simply copy/pasting your print articles onto the Internet are over, as readers (and, likely, your employers) are more often demanding fresh online content. But how do you attract new eyes for the Web without alienating your print audience? Well, it’s complicated.

However, you can learn some new tips and tools in mediabistro.com’s featured course of the day, Reinventing Print Content for the Web. Over six weeks, you’ll learn how to incorporate new technologies with print, as well as manage the tricky terrain of user-generated-content and content partnerships.

Oh, and did we mention that you can save 25 percent today only* with the promo code SUMMER25? If you’re already a new media whiz, no worries. There are over 100 other mediabistro summer courses in everything from journalism to graphic design for you to choose from.

* This sale is only available June 1, 2001, and may not be applied to past purchases or combined with any other discounts or promotions. Not valid for Weekend Warrior: 2-Day Film School, Certificate Programs, Self-Paced Courses, or How-To Videos.