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Posts Tagged ‘Julie Moos’

How News Orgs Used Social Media to Pay Tribute to Whitney Houston

When the news broke that Whitney Houston had died, the world was shocked.

Social media sites lit up. On Twitter, hashtags related to Houston and her name itself dominated the trending topics. YouTube’s News channel featured her videos. Fan pages were created on Facebook. On Pinterest a search for “Whitney Houston” revealed dozens and dozens of pins. Videos and photos, from album and magazine covers to more candid ones, created what Poynter’s Julie Moos termed a “scrapbook of her career.”

While some news organizations covered it in the usual way with the standard obituary, videos, and slideshows of photos, others took Houston’s untimely death as an opportunity to experiment with using social media to pay tribute to the artist. A few outlets, such as Mashable, created Spotify playlists to honor Houston.

In particular, there were three that stood out and used social media tools to create particularly effective memorials to Houston. Read more

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Poynter Editor: Jim Romenesko’s Posts Have “Incomplete Attribution” But Aren’t Plagiarism

Poynter editor Julie Moos has announced that many posts written by its highly respected columnist/blogger Jim Romenesko, founder of the Romenesko blog, “exhibit a pattern of incomplete attribution.” Namely, the  posts in question “included the original author’s verbatim language without containing his or her words in quotation marks, as they should have.”

The Romenesko blog is one of the most well-known, and revered, blogs in the industry and read daily by journalists everywhere. Romenesko, who has now resigned who is semi-retiring, has been around for years and is looked up to by many. So this announcement was very surprising.

Moos is very careful not to use the P-word — plagiarism — in the post. I emailed her to ask her why she didn’t consider Romenesko’s actions to be plagiarism. Her response:

“Jim’s intent was to credit the source and his posts do that with a source line and at least one link back to the original material, often more. He is transparent about where the information originated, he just missed a step by failing to signal the reader with quotation marks when verbatim text was being used. Others are free to characterize it how they wish, I don’t characterize it as plagiarism, which usually involves an intent to deceive.” Read more