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Posts Tagged ‘Liz Heron’

The Biggest Challenges Facing Publications Today

Mediabistro talked to Mashable’s executive editor and chief content officer Jim Roberts and The Wall Street Journal‘s emerging media editor Liz Heron at Social Media Week in New York. WSJ hosted a panel at the event, which focused on the effects of social and mobile on journalism.

For Heron, the biggest challenge is the new competition that publications face from social networks. “Our friends in Silicon Valley are creating so many engaging experiences that are competing with us [for] people’s time and interest,” she said. “It’s also an opportunity… We can be a part of that revolution instead of being cut out by it.”

“One of [Mashable's] challenges/opportunities, is taking a lot of the traffic that we get from social channels and keeping them,” said Roberts. “I think all of us in the news/information world face that challenge in one way or another.”

For more, check out our sister site, SocialTimes.

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How The Wall Street Journal Is Using Facebook to Cover Facebook

In March, around the time Facebook launched its Timeline format, Poynter published a piece declaring “Facebook Timeline not yet a friend to news organizations.” The post’s author, Jeff Sonderman, wrote “the flashy visual template adds too little style while removing too much substance.”

The social media team at The Wall Street Journal might beg to disagree. In an innovative piece of social journalism, WSJ reporters and editors are using Facebook’s Timeline tool to cover Facebook’s initial public offering.

The news org has created a new Facebook page, www.facebook.com/GoesPublic, using Timeline to not only chronicle its IPO roadshow but to also tell the history of Facebook.

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Apply Now For The New York Times Social Media Internship

Are you a student journalist who lives and breathes all things social media? Then The New York Times is looking for you.

The Grey Lady is offering an internship on its social media desk for the spring semester. If you’re interested, you better move fast. The deadline has been extended to Jan. 20, said Liz Heron, the news org’s social media editor.
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4 Questions With Liz Heron, The New York Times Social Media Editor

“Four Questions With …” is an occasional series of interviews with different social media editors in the news industry.

Photo Credit: Eddie Vega

The role of social media editor is a relatively new, and highly coveted, spot in newsrooms. While there are still a lot of unknowns about what exactly this job entails, everyone can agree that there needs to be at least one person handling social media for the company full-time.

So, what is it like to be a social media editor? What are the job responsibilities and how does one end up landing such a gig? The goal of “Four Questions With …” is to answer some of these questions and to give insight into what is a new and constantly evolving field.

We unofficially started off the series in October, when I interviewed Daniel Victor, ProPublica’s then-new social media editor. Now we turn to Liz Heron, one of two social media editors at The New York Times.

Heron joined The New York Times in August 2010, after working at ABC News and the Washington Post. She, along with her colleague Lexi Mainland, are the go-to people at the NYT when it comes to all things social media.

Here are her thoughts on social media and journalism. Read more

Humans vs. Cyborgs: Four Ways @NYTimes Has Changed This Week

On Monday, New York Times social media editors Lexi Mainland and Liz Heron announced from the @NYTimes account that all week long, they would be engaging in a social experiment: the automated @NYTimes Twitter account would be complemented by a handwritten approach, with  Mainland and Heron taking turns writing tweets. Heron told Poynter that the experiment “is about changing the perception, and it’s about being a little more strategic about what we put out there — finding the most engaging content.”

According to Heron, Times staffers have joined in with the automated feed before, but this is the first time it has been totally turned off. So how has @NYTimes changed since the humans at the Times usurped the cyborgs? As it turns out, the differences between the automated feed and the handwritten one are pretty stark. For avid Twitter users, some of these changes may seem a little duh-worthy, but for a news organization with a notoriously ambivalent relationship with social media, these changes may represent an important attitudinal shift in regards to social networking.

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