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Posts Tagged ‘magazine editor jobs’

Vibe‘s Jermaine Hall: ‘Being editor-in-chief is a lot of schmoozing’

In the same year that music mags Blender and Giant folded, Vibe shuttered, as well. But, luckily for the iconic mag, it was snapped up by a private equity firm, and editor-in-chief Jermaine Hall was brought on to resurrect the pub. And resurrect it, he did.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Hall explains how the mag is winning again and explains why editors-in-chief need to be more than just good writers.

“A lot of things that come with being editor-in-chief aren’t necessarily drilled down into the day-to-day tasks. It’s a lot of schmoozing; it’s a lot of fixing relationships; it’s a lot of bartering; it’s a lot of people skills,” he said. “It’s really going out there to be the ambassador of the brand on all levels. And that doesn’t necessarily come from being the strongest writer, it just really comes from people skills and the contacts and the relationships there that you’ve been able to build over your career. So, I think it’s knowing that it’s more than just writing and more than just editing at this level.”

For more, read So What Do You Do, Jermaine Hall, Editor-in-Chief of Vibe?

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Lucky‘s Brandon Holley on the Key to Moving Up: ‘Steady Input Without Being Annoying’

Brandon Holley held editor positions at Time Out and GQ, helped launch Elle Girl and headed Yahoo! Shine before taking the helm at Lucky in 2011. And, she says, if you want to snag a top spot on a magazine masthead, you need to be a vocal and proactive voice for the brand.

“I think people make a mistake when they wanna climb the masthead, and they assume the editor-in-chief should pay attention to them. And, now that I’m on the other side of the desk, I love people who come to me,” Holley said in our Media Beat interview.

Holley explained that she succeeded at GQ by giving “steady input without being annoying” to editor-in-chief Art Cooper. “I wasn’t kissing ass, but I would write memos to him and say, ‘I think this section could use this,’ and ‘I think we should start a new section that’s this’… I’m a huge fan of memo writing.”

Part 2: Brandon Holley Calls Fashion Blogging ‘Most Exciting Thing to Happen in Publishing in Decades’
Part 3: Lucky’s Brandon Holley Talks Photoshop and Fashion

5 Signs You’re Ready to Be an Editor

For writers looking to shift their careers, an editing position often seems like the next logical step. But, before you start eyeing that spot on the masthead, make sure you have these key magazine and newspaper editor skill sets.

No. 5: A gift for finding the “so what?” in a story

It’s great that you can spot comma splices and sentence fragments, but great editors can also pull out the important elements of a story so readers don’t end up feeling like they just squandered their last five or so minutes.

“One of the things I can do really well is I can see a story in my mind before it’s written. When you’re writing, it’s all about getting the ideas out. It’s more emotional,” said Kweli WrightJuicy contributing editor. ”When you’re editing, you have to think like a writer but also think like a reader and make sure that the beginning, middle, conclusion and quotes make sense to make the story come alive.”

Read more in 5 Signs You’re Ready to Be an Editor. [subscription required]

Andrea Hackett