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Posts Tagged ‘mobile’

AJ+ Targets the Millennial News Consumer

AJ+This week, Al Jazeera launched a new app, AJ+, geared towards the millennial news consumer.

The app centers around stacks, with video content, chat options, and quizzes and polls. It’s an immersive news experience, focused on context. But what’s really interesting is the AJ+ editorial’s team methods. The content on the app isn’t pulled from Al Jazeera and repackaged for the app — it’s specifically for the platform.

They have an editorial team and and engagement team; they call their morning meeting an “engage-atorial” meeting, as a perfect blend of the two. Executive Director of Strategy and Development, Dr. Yaser Bishr says:

The core changes are in the workflow. We give a lot of power to the engagement team and our journalists on the ground that make it unique…Icome from a software background, so I can talk forever about the features of the app. I look at the apps and everything around it as the way to tell the story. The change is the way we operate.

The have journalists on the ground all over the world and regional fellows: they divided the world into six regions to have a fellow in each one, to report on important stories and events, but also to “manage and curate,” as Bishr puts it, a social, local community in that region. They received over 3,000 applications for the six positions. Bishr says that those who didn’t make it have also connected over social media and have their own, organic group to share news.

The goal of the app and the AJ+ team is to, according to Bishr, to change “not just the way news is gathered and produced, but also consumed.”

You can follow them @AJPlus or on Facebook.

 

 

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Rumble and Digital First Media Partner Up, Update Their Ideas of Mobile

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Last week, Digital First Media announced a partnership with Rumble, the mobile publishing platform. I’ve written about Digital First Media before, when they announced their plan to “unbolt” digital newsrooms from their print culture. This partnership is a move in that direction.

They aren’t just a new Rumble client. The two companies instead have partnered up for mutual benefits. According to Rumble cofounder and CRO Uyen Tieu, they had a team of developers in DFM’s newsrooms for a week, going through their systems, poking around their servers and taking stock of what they are currently working with. This way, says Tieu, Rumble can work with them to give them exactly what they want and need. Tieu says that they are a good fit for publishers like Digital First Media because they are a centralized platform “but we are agnostic in that we are open to working with everyone…we play well in the sandbox with others.”

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Gawker’s Kinja Platform: Please Don’t Make Me Blog for You

It finally happened. I’m not ashamed to admit that I’m a bit of a Gawker groupie and I’ve been waiting for the rollout of Kinja on all of their sites. Not because I am an avid commenter (that requires more dedication than I can give), but because I wanted to see how it was going to work from the sidelines. I have mixed feelings.

 1) Mobile Layouts 

I know that everyone keeps saying that mobile is the future, and it is, of course. Fine. But I still don’t know how I’m supposed to work on a tablet. The old Gawker layout was optimized for a desktop experience, with the main blog post and a scroll down menu of new and trending posts. You could pick and choose, hop around the site before getting back to whatever you were avoiding before you came to Gawker in the first place.

The new Kinja layout is clean, sleek and modern. Everything you want a digital experience to be — except that you have to scroll around too much. I find myself reading many of the blurbs without actually clicking on a story. And when you do click into a story, that’s it. You have to work to browse. 

On a tablet, the Kinja reading experience makes more sense. Video and ads and posts all come together in one, non-annoying, continuous roll. My reaction to reading the new Gawker on my laptop is the first time I ever felt old. And why can’t you Tweet single posts? What’s the deal, Denton?   Read more

How to Shoot Video from a Smartphone Like a Pro

These days, carrying around a full video rig is the last thing a journalist wants to do when in the middle of important breaking news. Thankfully, the smartphone is rapidly becoming the go-to option for capturing news as it happens, and the rise of HD quality video in such a small package means that more important and newsworthy moments are being captured and shared throughout the world.

The only caveat is, for better for worse, shooting video on a small, light smartphone has a steep learning curve. To get a compelling, color-balanced shot that isn’t shaky or blurry is a mammoth task — an unknowledgeable shooter can easily end up with muddy, diffuse content that isn’t share-worthy.

Luckily, there are some easy and effective tips to get a great shot. Read more

A Journalist’s Quick Primer on Who Uses Cell Phones (and How)

A big push in journalism right now? Mobile. An important piece of information for knowing how to make a good journalism strategy for mobile? How people actually use mobile.

There are many types of “mobile” out there, of course (mobile phones, yes, but also an increasing amount of tablets and the like). But the Pew Internet and American Life project just compiled much of its research on cell phone usage and demographic statistics into one handy location. And because the cell phone is still the major mobile device, I thought it might prove helpful to highlight some significant stats as they relate to journalism strategy.

Many of these stats may at first seem most helpful to those dabbling in the business of journalism, but knowing them could also benefit to the savvy journalist. Some stats may be promising for your strategy; some may be a reality check. In any case, “knowing your audience” (and source) is always important, as we have blogged about heavily as of late.

The connected world is not quite flat. It’s worthwhile to have a baseline of probability for content success or finding the right social voices in a pinch.

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