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Posts Tagged ‘New York Times’

Highlights From New York Times‘ Science Graphics Editor Jonathan Corum’s Keynote Address At Tapestry Conference

A breakdown of Tapestry Conference attendees, compiled by Ellie Fields.

NASHVILLE — A group of 100 journalists, academics, software developers, business leaders, designers, non-profits and government representatives are gathered at a hotel in Tennessee this morning to talk about weaving stories and data in the first-ever Tapestry Conference.

Jonathan Corum, graphics editor at the New York Times, opened the conference with a keynote about how he finds stories in data. More about Jonathan:

Jonathan Corum is the science graphics editor at The New York Times. His print graphics have won 15 awards from the Society for News Design and 8 medals from the international Malofiej competition. In 2009 the Times graphics desk received a National Design Award for communication design.

He talked about narrative, exploration, editing, audience and more. Here are the best tweets from his keynote address (after the jump).
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NYT, Gannett And Others Join AP Suit Against Meltwater

Several of the biggest names in the daily news business joined the AP in its fight against online news clipping service Meltwater News this week. The publishers coming to support AP by filing an amicus brief in its ongoing lawsuit include the New York Times Company, Advance Publications, Gannett, The McClatchy Company and the Newspaper Association of America (which represents 2,000 organizations).

Last year, the Associated Press filed a lawsuit against Meltwater claiming the service — a paid electronic clipping service that monitors and delivers news stories on keyword-specific topics to its paying customers — violated AP copyright and competed directly against AP by illegally selling its content. Since then, the back and forth battle over fair use and what’s fair on the Internet has intensified, with supporters on both sides.

This week, the newspapers weighed in and filed an amicus brief supporting the AP (download the full PDF of the brief, which is worth reading). Here’s their take on the issue and what’s at stake:

It takes no friend-of-the-court brief for the Court to know that the rise of the Internet has been highly disruptive to the nation’s news organizations, as their readers and advertisers have migrated to the Web. In response, the nation’s news organizations, including the amici on this brief, have at considerable expense developed their own Websites and digital businesses to carry their news reports. These digital businesses are supported by electronic advertising revenue, electronic subscription revenue, and licensing income from other publishers and users and aggregators. None of these revenue streams can be sustained if news organizations are unable to protect their news reports from the wholesale copying and redistribution by free-riders like Meltwater.
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10 ‘Snowfall’-like Projects That Break Out of Standard Article Templates

“Snowfall” has become a verb in many newsrooms after The New York Times launched its beautiful multimedia project earlier this year. Though the format was touted as the future of online storytelling by some, The Times wasn’t the first to pull of this type of format. If you’re looking for inspiration to make snow fall in your own newsroom, here are a few other examples, not all of which come from newsrooms, as I think it would be irresponsible of us to confine ourselves to the sphere of news organizations when collecting inspiration for innovative storytelling formats.

1. Pitchfork: Glitter in the Dark

Favorite feature: Layering multiple shots in the background that change as you scroll, mimicking the action of a photoshoot.

 

2.  ESPN: The Long, Strange Trip of Dock Ellis

Favorite feature: Curtain-style parallax that reveals the next layer of content as you scroll. (Tutorial on how to do this).

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3 Important Takeaways from the NYT/Tesla Battle

What could make venerated publication and hallowed critical voice the New York Times backpedal ungraciously and admit some shaky practices by their own staff writer? The electric car.

Over the past week, the dust-up between electric car company Tesla and the Times regarding a scathing review that accused the car company of poor planning — both in the car and on the road — has resulted in a pile of open letters and pushback on all sides. Tesla founder and tech influencer Elon Musk took to Twitter to accuse the Times of lying and intentionally setting up the car to fail, while reporter John Broder shot back with his own responses to all of Musk’s critiques on the publication’s Wheels Blog. After days of similar comments from all sides, Public Editor Margaret Sullivan finally published her reporting post-mortem yesterday afternoon. In the lengthy piece, Sullivan admits that while Broder exhibited “good faith” in his desire to review Tesla’s much-hyped Model S, his judgement during the trip was not sound.

It’s a tangled interaction, but one that merits a deep examination into the new world journalists live in — one where companies can respond to damning critiques with their own dissection and gain a lot of exposure doing so. There are plenty of things to learn from this situation as a reporter, editor and critic, but here are just a few quick takeaways that will help you be better in the field.  Read more

What China’s Hacking Proves About Data Journalism and Security

Yesterday, the New York Times released a report indicating that their systems had been repeatedly breached by Chinese hackers over a period of four months, particularly stealing reporters’ passwords and looking up information related to one of the Chinese government’s top leaders, Premier Wen Jiabao. Later, the Wall Street Journal admitted that their systems experienced similar attacks from Chinese sources, and hinted that the motivations could have been similar.

More than anything, the attacks on these papers from mysterious foreign sources hunting for information sheds light on one clear and important point:

Now, more than ever, publishing outlets need to have protection against cyberattacks. Read more

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