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Posts Tagged ‘newspapers’

Google Uses Print Newspaper Ad To Advertise Search Ad Effectiveness

Google searches frequently help drive traffic to news stories at newspaper websites.

But here’s a different twist on the relationship between the search giant and newspapers: Using a newspaper to drive advertisers to the search giant.

That’s what Google apparently hopes to achieve in its new ad, which Globe and Mail media reporter Steve Ladurantaye discovered in his paper and then tweeted. Or maybe the message to take away is the opposite, as Ladurantaye tweeted about the half-page ad: “An ad for Google ads in today’s Globe demonstrates the value of print ads, yes?”

Mashable follows up noting the ad apparently also ran in the National Post, another Canadian paper and Globe and Mail competitor.

(H/T Romenesko for catching this tweet.)

Paywall Pace Increases, As More News Sites Limit Free Articles

If you read your local, hometown or regional newspaper online chances are you’ve hit or will soon be faced with a paywall. That’s because an analysis of Newspaper Association of America data by EByline shows news sites have picked up the pace of paywall adoption in recent months. Previously, they found that larger newspapers, especially, have erected paywalls to try and capture some digital revenue after years of fee-free online reading.

Here’s what EByline’s Susan Johnson found:

A few trends pop out of the data (which has a few holes but is otherwise pretty comprehensive): meters galore, discounts for print subscribes are overwhelmingly popular and, most significantly, an accelerating pace of adoption that peaked late last year but is picking up steam again. This suggests that while experimentation with paywall specifics continues, the journalism industry believes they ultimately have a solution to their digital problem.

According to EByline’s reporting, 84 percent of the papers listed in the NAA database as having payrolls use a metered paywall approach, where they let visitors sample a limited number of articles without paying for access or subscribing.

Johnson’s analysis found the average number of free articles a news site allows readers is 11.2. You’ll remember, the New York Times recently lowered its free article count from 20 to 10. So maybe that really is the sweet spot?

Poynter also looked at the data and has some more details about which organizations have instituted payrolls, and who’s at the low end (3) and the high end (25). It notes 156 papers have adopted paywalls, with more already announced but not yet implemented.

The full Ebyline post is worth reading for more information on their analysis and predictions.

YOUR TURN: What do you think of the paywall approach? Inevitable, or annoying? Saving journalism, or hastening its demise? Tell us in the comments, or @10000words

L.A. Weekly‘s Sarah Fenske on Finding (and Keeping) Digital Journos

SarahFenske.jpgSarah Fenske has come a long way since she began her career as a reporter in the Midwest. Now the editor-in-chief of L.A. Weekly, Fenske handles new responsibilities, overseeing both the print and online versions of the pub.

In Mediabistro’s latest So What Do You Do? interview, the award-winning writer and editor talked about the key to landing reporters who truly get the Web.

“Frankly, I think part of it is giving them a chance to take a break from online,” she said.  “The L.A. Weekly has a few perks that online-only sites don’t have: We can give you the chance to write about music or art if that’s your thing. And, hopefully, we can help you find the time to mix it up and write a 4,000-word cover story, too.”

She continued, “But it is tough. I have no idea how most bloggers can sustain that pace. I used to fill in for our news blogger in St. Louis when he was on vacation (the perils of leading a small staff!), and it just about killed me. I have the utmost respect for anyone writing multiple posts per day.”

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Sarah Fenske?

Andrea Hackett

Newspaper Prom Dresses (As Awesome As They Sound)

This newspaper dress contest was too fun not to pass on.

When I was in high school (which wasn’t that long ago, eh hem, a decade), I remember some kids entering a contest for designing and wearing duct tape prom attire. This takes it to a whole other, way more awesome level.

The Detroit Free Press encouraged local students to design prom dresses made from newspapers for the chance to win $500. And what the local girls came up with is nothing short of awesome.


Users can select their favorite dress and rank them to help determine the $500 winner.

The Freep says it received more than 20 entries. You can check out the photo gallery of the top eight newspaper dressmaker finalists here. And you can vote on your favorite until midnight Thursday.

This is a great example of a way for a newspaper to engage its readership — especially its young readers — and promote the print product in a creative way. They tie it together nicely with the smooth voting/ranking mechanism and online contest. Innovative and fun for participants and other readers.

Thanks to Poynter for pointing this contest out. They also have some fun links to other newspaper fashions, including this gallery of newspaper dresses.

You Tell Us: What Are Social Media’s Limitations In Your Newsroom?

Much is made about how social media has changed newsrooms, and I’m one of those people who talks a lot about it.

But for all of that talk, there comes a point where you need to decide what action to take, if any.

Newsrooms today are bombarded with lists of best practice, how-to’s and draconian Do This Or You Will Perish blogs and articles.

Do you go with the herd, or do you hold your own and keep moving forward the best way you know how?

I’d really like to hear from some of our readers who are “on the ground” as a part of, or observing, their newsroom’s transformation and/or adoption of social media and online communities.

Not everyone is going to have an easy time of it, but there is certainly opportunity to learn from each other’s experiences.

If you have something to share,  please chime in with a comment below about the horror stories, or the tales of greatness at the news organization you work at.

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