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Posts Tagged ‘Nick Denton’

How Do You Respond to Trolls? You Don’t.

Do you read the comment thread on your articles and columns? Sometimes, when a piece gets lots of social media attention, it’s hard not to. It’s even been suggested that depending on the tone of a comment thread, readers opinions can change. Comments are content, too. I’m don’t belong to any commenter community on any site, but I do read the threads on some of my favorite news sites. Sometimes they can be useful or just funny, and sometimes, they make me lose my faith in humanity.

In a recent essay, Jeff Jarvis sets out to define the troll. By using Aaron James’ Assholes:  A Theory as a jumping point, Jarvis defines the troll as a specific, if not just web-based, animal. The troll is out for blood. Your blood. And responding to them only makes them happy.

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Coming Soon From Gawker: A Way To Get Rid Of ‘Boring’ Comments?

There are spam comments, flaming comments, troll comments … and then there are just plain old boring comments.

Nick Denton. (Photo by Dave Winer)

It’s a problem that faces many news websites.

So Nick Denton, the influential head of Gawker Media, said at a conference hosted by Advertising Age on Tuesday that his company was developing a product to rid his sites of comments he considers boring.

“I would like an AT&T engineer who has an explanation for why AT&T’s data coverage is weak in New York and San Francisco to feel comfortable in our comment environment,” he said.

Indeed, the comment sections of articles are often used for official responses and the like. But that’s often the exception. Read more