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Posts Tagged ‘Pew Research Center’

5 Stats That Should Have Journalism Organizations Thinking About Mobile

It’s no surprise to anyone reading this that mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, are skyrocketing in popularity and usage. But it’s still shocking to see some news sites that aren’t fully optimized for the mobile experience.

I’m guessing some organizations aren’t putting as much stock in it due to resources and actually having people in house who can ensure products work on multiple platforms. But perhaps some organizations just don’t understand the growth in users adopting tablets and smartphones to get the news.

A study released earlier this week by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism, which surveyed 9,513 U.S. adults, shows a clear picture of the growth of mobile usage.

Here are five stats that I believe news organizations will find intriguing:

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Pew Study Looks At Photo, Video Sharing Habits

There’s a lot of pressure on journalists and news organizations to be everywhere, not just when it comes to feet on the ground reporting but also when it comes to tweets, pins, posts, etc. on all form of social media.

We’ve even encouraged the trend with tips to maximize your presence on everything from Google+ to Pinterest. Which is why this Pew Internet & American Life Project’s study about how photos and videos are shared socially caught my eye.

Their findings shed some interesting light on how many (or few) people are actually using these various networks. (This wasn’t the focus of the study but looked interesting, so I created this graph.)

Primarily, their questions were about how many adults post photos/videos online and how many share them, and whether the media they post/share was their original creation or that of someone else. Nearly half — 46 percent — of the online adult population surveyed indicated they post original photos, while 41 percent share photos they’ve found online on social networks. Overall, their study found that 56 percent of Internet users do at least one of those activities, posting their creations or sharing someone else’s. News organizations rely on both: The eye-witness videos from the scene of the event and the “curators” who share the organization’s videos and photos so other online users can find it.
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Study: Number of Daily Twitter Users Have Doubled

A new study from Pew Internet finds that the number of daily Twitter users among adults has doubled since May of last year, even though the overall percentage of Twitter users has only grown 2 percent since that time. The authors of the study attributed the increase to a rise in smartphone usage—smartphone owners are twice as likely as others to use Twitter on a typical day. Young adults have had the largest increase in smartphone usage, which perhaps explains why 18 to 24-year-old Internet users have undergone the largest increase in Twitter usage: about one third of them use Twitter, and those who use it on a daily basis have doubled.

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Infographic: How Social Media Wins At Breaking News

Here’s some lunch-time fodder to consider. How reliant are you on social media to keep up on the latest news? How has this changed for you in the past decade?

To put this in perspective, think about this:

  • On September 11, 2001, how did you hear about the World Trade Center attacks? For those in New York and D.C., how did you connect with your loved ones to let them know you were OK? For everyone else, how did you show your support? Chances are you watched the towers fall on TV, read the full story in the next edition of the newspaper and grabbed a copy of a news weekly that week, which you perhaps hung on to as a moment in history. Likely, as well, you talked to your family and friends in person or over the phone if you could get through. It definitely wasn’t via Twitter of Facebook, neither had been invented yet.
  • On May 1, 2011, how did you hear about the death of Osama Bin Laden? (Or before that, about President Barack Obama’s planned press conference announcing the death?) Chances are good you heard about it on Twitter or Facebook, or from someone who heard about it from some sort of social media.
  • While both the old and new media clearly have a role in telling news stories (and especially the stories behind the news) today, social media has clearly become the way to find and share breaking news for a large portion of the population. This infographic from Schools.com uses info from a variety of sources, including the Pew Research Center’s recent report on “What Facebook and Twitter Mean For News“, to pretty aptly cover some of the seismic shifts taking place in the news industry, in particular how consumers receive their news.

    This graphic tips at, but doesn’t seek to explain the bigger problem: Trust. With news spreading so swiftly, it’s hard to discern fact from fascination when people eager to break news share it before verifying it. But that’s a question that needs answered another day.

    Here’s the full graphic: Read more

    4% of Mobile Users Used Phones to Monitor Election News, Study Finds

    Eighty-two percent of American adults have cell phones, though just 4 percent of adults used their phones to monitor election results during this past midterm election cycle, according to a study released Thursday by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project.

    The number of adults with mobile devices has fluctuated between 73 percent in April 2006 and 85 percent in April 2009 and September 2010, according to the survey.

    The study found that of the 82 percent of adults with cell phones, 71 percent use their phone for texting, while a much smaller 39 percent use their phones to access the Internet.

    The most popular election-related activity on mobile devices? Telling others they had voted, which 14 percent of respondents with phones said they did.

    Interestingly, just 10 percent of respondents used their phones to inform others about voting conditions, delays, long lines and voter turnout at their polling place.

    News organizations which attempted to crowdsource voting problems — The Washington Post’s vote monitor a notable example — seemed to get relatively small responses. This study provides hard numbers as to why there was such low response.

    A total of 2,257 adults participated in the survey, which was conducted between Nov. 3 and Nov. 24 and has a margin of error of +/- 3 percentage points.

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