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Posts Tagged ‘Poynter’

National Press Club, Poynter Team Up For Talk on Journalism Gender Gap

presclubFinally, we have an opportunity to let out all our feelings about the firing of Jill Abramson and the massive journalism gender problem on our hands someplace other than the Internet.

Poynter and The National Press Club have agreed to co-host a discussion forum called “Closing Journalism’s Gender Gap: A Forum on Women and Leadership” in Washington, D.C. on June 30, designed to address newsroom culture in America as it relates to gender.

Questions to be asked include ”Why has the number of women leaders in media remained unchanged over the past decade?, “Has the focus on new technology affected the advancement of women leaders in newsrooms?, and “What news organizations have effectively advanced women leaders, and how did they do it?” (Good luck answering that one).

Speakers reflect some of the publishing industry’s most influential women:

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Why Does a Mainstream Media Outlet Want a Share of this Non-profit Digital Site’s Pulitzer?

OK, the headline is a maybe over the top, but the sentiment isn’t. Why does a mainstream media TV news organization want a cut of a non-profit digital site’s Pulitzer?

cpi pulitzer announcementThe non-profit digital news site Center for Public Integrity was awarded its first Pulitzer Prize this week for its in-depth, dogged reporting on miners systematically denied medical care for black lung and related conditions. The top prize in journalism is a major feat for any news organization, much less a digital non-profit.

That would be where the happy story ends… except Poynter today is reporting on a project partner who’s less impressed with the award, not because it wasn’t deserved but because they felt like they deserved the credit too. The reporting was shared with the ABC News team, allowing the black lung project to reach a significantly wider audience. Read more

Even Upworthy’s Corrections Are Designed To Go Viral

upworthycorrection_featuredYou’ve seen and no doubt probably shared a piece of content or two that came to your attention via viral news-worth-sharing aggregator Upworthy. But have you ever gone back to a piece you shared, or circled back to a piece you’ve already seen before?

No?

That’s the problem with corrections on the Internet. Nobody (OK, very few people) goes back to re-read or re-watch something they’ve already seen. Why would you when there are hundreds of thousands of other awesome videos that will make you cry or reconsider your life waiting for you to discover.

But what happens if that video or story misled you or contained inaccuracies? You’ll probably never know, or forget the source where you first saw that mistake appear. In a newspaper, clarifications and corrections are typically appended to the stories and appear in print, either near the masthead or in a standard area of the section of the paper. Blog posts often append updated information at the top or bottom, or strike-through info that comes to light as being wrong. But how do you get those misinformed visitors to come back to see that?
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Journalist Sues Police For Barring Drone Videography Of Crash Scene

Any desperate local news reporter who’s ever been denied access to a crime or accident scene can relate to the motivation behind the attempted work-around one Connecticut TV photographer, Pedro Rivera, used to circumvent the road block while at the scene of a fatal crash: an overhead drone to grab some video.

Yes, drones. As in unmanned flying crafts more likely to evoke images of the Middle East than the East Coast. But you can buy small drones capable of capturing a video online for about $1,000, which is cheaper than a pro DSLR or even many lenses. That’s much more affordable than a helicopter to hover over news scenes, which is why the idea is actually kind of genius. Except, maybe not…

dronejournalism_featuredimgSo why haven’t more other enterprising journalists thought of this yet? Probably because the FAA says it’s not legal. They say commerical use of the video from these drones is not allowed, but apparently are reviewing things, per the Hartford Courant story on Rivera’s case. (They also note that Rivera wasn’t actually on the job at the scene, and the station he works for didn’t air the video, so it may not even have been a commercial use.)

Rivera, according to the Courant, has filed a federal lawsuit against the local police for blocking his drone usage at the accident scene earlier this month. He claims they violated his civil rights when they stopped him. (H/T Romenesko) Read more

Still Making Summer Plans? Deadline Nears For Google’s Journalism Fellowship

It’s the time of year when young journalists start hearing back about their internship applications or perhaps getting worried if they haven’t heard back yet.

googleIf you haven’t already received and accepted an offer and made your summer plans, you still have some time to apply for one of the coolest opportunities available this summer: the Google Journalism Fellowship. But not much time — the deadline is this week.

This isn’t your typical summer internship, though. It’s something more immersive, more data-centric and, honestly, sounds more fun. They’re looking for journalism students who have already demonstrated proficiency and interest in digital projects and technologies, but the desired skills and interests are pretty reasonable for j-school students these days. Here’s how they describe the gig:

The program is aimed at undergraduate, graduate and journalism students interested in using technology to tell stories in new and dynamic ways. The Fellows will get the opportunity to spend the summer contributing to a variety of organizations — from those that are steeped in investigative journalism to those working for press freedom around the world and to those that are helping the industry figure out its future in the digital age. There will be a focus on data driven journalism, online free expression and rethinking the business of journalism.

And they will pay the fellows $8,000 (plus a travel stipend) for 10 weeks, from June through August, to work at one of these journalism organizations:

  • Center for Investigative Reporting
  • Committee to Protect Journalists
  • Investigative Reporters & Editors
  • Nieman Journalism Lab
  • Pew Research Center’s Journalism Project
  • Poynter
  • PRI.org
  • ProPublica
  • Sunlight Foundation
  • Texas Tribune

This application is due Friday, January 31… So, um, why are you wasting time?! Apply here.

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