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Posts Tagged ‘Poynter’

How to Achieve These 3 New Year’s Resolutions For Journalists

Thinking ahead a month might seem like an eternity for many journalists in the thick of holiday stories and planning for vacations. But before you hang up your hat on 2013, you should make a plan for how you’ll do better in 2014.

journalismresolutionsWant to be a better journalist? Here are three professional New Year’s resolutions you can make — and keep — for next year, and how to do it.

1. Learn something new

Yeah yeah, this is sort of what journalists do every day for their research. But when was the last time you sat down and took a class, attended a professional conference or just read a book related to your craft? In a world that’s constantly demanding new skills, you’ll soon be irrelevant if you don’t keep up on the trade. Here’s a few ideas on how to do it: Read more

5 Stats to Note From Poynter’s iPad Eye-Tracking Study

Last week, Poynter shared findings from its recent eye-tracking study. Using “eyetracking gear, observation and exit interviews,” Poynter tracked 36 people as they engaged with news stories on an iPad, an article for the study noted.

In order to make sure differences between study participants were apparent, Poynter brought in candidates from two separate age groups: 18-28-year-olds and 45-55-year-olds.

According to Poynter, iPad users in the study fell into one of two categories when they were interacting with a news story:

“People were either intimately involved with the iPad screen while reading during our recent eyetracking study — keeping nearly constant contact while touching, tapping, pinching and swiping to adjust their view — or they carefully arranged a full screen of text before physically detaching as they sat back to read.”

Read more

Mobile Users Turn to Established News Sources, Survey Says

There’s a new survey out that paints an interesting picture about how digital news consumers are getting their news. The survey, which was backed by The New York Times, gathered responses from 3,022 U.S. adults between the ages of 18 and 65 to understand the news sources users are accessing.

Of those adults surveyed, 85 percent were categorized as “news consumers” who access news multiple times per week.

According to a Poynter article on the survey, 53 percent of “digital news consumers” noted that they turn to Web-native sources, such as The Huffington Post, Yahoo News, or Drudge Report. Compare this to 43 percent of news consumers who said that they access “established news” organizations, such as The New York Times or CNN, to get their news.

Read more

Paywall Pace Increases, As More News Sites Limit Free Articles

If you read your local, hometown or regional newspaper online chances are you’ve hit or will soon be faced with a paywall. That’s because an analysis of Newspaper Association of America data by EByline shows news sites have picked up the pace of paywall adoption in recent months. Previously, they found that larger newspapers, especially, have erected paywalls to try and capture some digital revenue after years of fee-free online reading.

Here’s what EByline’s Susan Johnson found:

A few trends pop out of the data (which has a few holes but is otherwise pretty comprehensive): meters galore, discounts for print subscribes are overwhelmingly popular and, most significantly, an accelerating pace of adoption that peaked late last year but is picking up steam again. This suggests that while experimentation with paywall specifics continues, the journalism industry believes they ultimately have a solution to their digital problem.

According to EByline’s reporting, 84 percent of the papers listed in the NAA database as having payrolls use a metered paywall approach, where they let visitors sample a limited number of articles without paying for access or subscribing.

Johnson’s analysis found the average number of free articles a news site allows readers is 11.2. You’ll remember, the New York Times recently lowered its free article count from 20 to 10. So maybe that really is the sweet spot?

Poynter also looked at the data and has some more details about which organizations have instituted payrolls, and who’s at the low end (3) and the high end (25). It notes 156 papers have adopted paywalls, with more already announced but not yet implemented.

The full Ebyline post is worth reading for more information on their analysis and predictions.

YOUR TURN: What do you think of the paywall approach? Inevitable, or annoying? Saving journalism, or hastening its demise? Tell us in the comments, or @10000words

NewsTrust Now A Part Of Poynter Network

NewsTrust, a social network that lets users rate quality of journalism, sent out a memo this evening to let its users know that Poynter is its new owner and operator, effective immediately.

NewsTrust has been a partner to The Poynter Institute for three years. From the announcement:

The Poynter Institute has been a NewsTrust partner since 2009 and collaborated regularly with our social news network. They share our commitment to news literacy and journalism education. We think our tools and services will be a great addition to Poynter’s News University, their innovative online journalism and media training site.

[...]

Now that we are part of the Poynter community, we hope to reach an even wider network of experienced journalists and students to use our tools, so we may all join forces to “help maintain the integrity, the stability, the progress of self-government” — a vision that we share with newspaperman Nelson Poynter.

According to the release, Poynter will now be curating the posts that appear on NewsTrust. Poynter’s banner navigation is already across the top of NewsTrust.net.

In the meantime, Fabrice Florin, who founded NewsTrust in 2005, will move on to join the Wikimedia Foundation where he’ll help engage readers to contribute quality content to Wikipedia.

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