GalleyCat FishbowlNY FishbowlDC UnBeige MediaJobsDaily SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser

Posts Tagged ‘radio’

Everything You Haven’t Read About ‘Serial’

serialOn Thursday I wake up to a bunch of WhatsApp messages from my London-based friend. Turns out the career woes we Skyped about earlier in the week are moot — there’s a new episode of “Serial” to listen to.

I won’t go into what “Serial” is, because if you don’t know by now, where have you been? But will you be let down because of all the hype? No. If anything, you have around 8 hours to listen to. It will be like that one time you signed into Netflix and hit play on “Orange is the New Black.” See  you on Monday. As a radio junkie, I was waiting for “Serial,” I heard the teasers, I was ready for it. I didn’t know I would become obsessed or that I would be sending text messages across the Atlantic Ocean begging for no spoilers!

We posted this article from the Washington Post on our Facebook page, and Facebook notified us this morning that it’s been performing better than any of our other, original, posts this week. Thanks a lot guys. So I’m going to give you what you want on this frigid Friday morning. Read more

Mediabistro Course

Get a Literary Agent

Get a Literary AgentWork with a publishing consultant to find the right agent for your book and write a query that will get the deal done! Starting December 3, learn the best methods for finding a literary agent, how to choose the right agent for your book, the etiquette of seeking literary representation, and how to stand out among the numerous queries agents receive daily. Register now!

Just Vote Already! How One Newsroom is Encouraging People to Vote in the Midterm Elections

justvotealreadyI may be a bit of a public radio fan girl, especially when it comes to New York’s WNYC and the Brian Lehrer Show. I’m not going to apologize for this. Because they do really fun, smart things in their newsroom. This fall, they’re taking on the midterm elections. A lot of pundits and newspeople will tell you that the scariest thing about midterm elections is that no one even knows there are elections in the first place. And isn’t our job as journos to inform the electorate?

The Brian Lehrer team is taking that seriously, especially since there’s a district in the Bronx which has the most registered non-voters, people are signed up, but they won’t rock the vote. Enter “Just Vote Already,” a series where they are talking to political insiders, data nuts, and even sent a reporter out to that district to leave “Just Vote Already” cards on their doorsteps.

The best part? They created a little widget where you can robocall your non-voting friends (in NYC only, unfortunately) and guilt trip them into voting come November 4th. There are about four different versions you can listen to here, but the main idea is this “we don’t care who you vote for, just vote! And sorry for the robocall.” If you live in NYC, you can send a friend a robocall below. If you don’t, I want to know how your newsrooms are covering the midterm elections. Tweet us @10,000Words.

A Radio Revolution: Radiotopia Announces 3 New Shows and Hits Kickstarter Goal

For podcasters, it’s been a busy month of fundraising. First, “Snap Judgment,” reached their fundraising goal to produce the best next season ever and then, this Tuesday, Radiotopia reached their Kickstarter goal with 23 days left to go.

Maybe it really is a radio revolution — centered on good storytelling and journalism. PRX has estimated that it takes about 50,000 core subscribers to ensure a podcast will be of interest to sponsors and pay its staff. By relying on listener support, philanthropy, and subscriptions, Radiotopia has grown substantially since its launch this past year. So when did radio become cool again?

PRX CEO Jake Shapiro says that:

It hasn’t been until really in the last two years that podcasting has become a mainstream audience format, it was always a niche format, because it was hard to use as a user. But now that everyone has been trained to think about on demand media, like Netflix, audio has now had this huge opportunity to become a mainstream platform of news and entertainment. Read more

The State of the Digital News Publishing Industry, According to the Internet

typefaceThere must be something in the air, maybe the end of a crazy year, that’s making writers introspective. In the past week alone, there have been some very good analyses of the state of the digital publishing . Since it’s cold outside (unless you live in a place where it’s not cold outside, and in that case, stop gloating) and you need some good reads for hibernation, here are five pieces that, I think, aptly explain the industry right now and help further the conversation.

“Against ‘Long Form’ Journalism,” James Bennett

Everybody in the room, put your hands together for Mr. Bennett. It’s not that he’s against expansive reporting, but the way the terminology is thrown around by publications. He asks:

“Is this just a fad, maybe even a fraud? Cynics would say that publishing a few big feature stories is a shortcut to respectability, and they’d be correct. But realists, I’m happy to say, would comment further that such features work: They draw in a lot of readers.”

Recently, I have find myself tapping out around page 3 or 4 of a feature article. By placing value on “long” we stop focusing on “interesting.” Let’s find another phrase, Bennet suggests, even if it proves tough;

Length is hardly the quality that most meaningfully classifies these stories. Yet there’s a real conundrum here: If long-form doesn’t fit, what term is elastic enough to encompass the varied journalism it has come to represent, from narrative to essay, profile to criticism? And how do you account for the blurring of boundaries as work from the digital realm energizes and reshapes traditional forms of journalism?

“Growing Obsession With Viral Content Exposes the Weakness of Most Digital Media,” Mathew Ingram

good post about Gawker’s Neetzan Zimmerman, although I wondered about this: “He posts only about a dozen items a day” http://t.co/rBfMIQvbxI

— Mathew Ingram (@mathewi) December 2, 2013

Let’s put aside the fact that that headline is really long and plays into some viral trends itself. After the Wall Street Journal’s profile on Neetzan Zimmerman, Ingram was irked by how many times a day the subject posted, and posits that focusing on viral content as a growth strategy, while it works for some, may not be a great idea. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket sort of thing:

But even if the content itself continues to work — in the sense that people will always want to share photos of otters holding hands or cats that look like Franklin Delano Roosevelt — the value of those millions of pageviews is continuing to drop. That’s not just because there are more and more sites doing it, but because the value of incremental pageviews is sinking inexorably towards zero. Read more

Why Was Planet Money’s Kickstarter Campaign So Successful?

At the time of this writing, NPR’s Planet Money has raised $524,286 on Kickstarter. The project has a day left, and is a pretty remarkable feat considering the sum is more than 10 times their initial goal of $50,000. So how did they do it? Read more

NEXT PAGE >>