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Posts Tagged ‘reporters’

Giving Thanks For Journalists Missing Abroad

jamesfoleyLast Thanksgiving, reporter James Foley was kidnapped in Syria and has not been heard from since. The one year anniversary passed last week on November 22, but in case you missed it, now that you have some downtime you should follow-up on his story.

According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, over 30 journalists are missing in Syria this year. Worldwide, 17 journlists have lost their lives.  While you’re giving thanks this season, keep our colleagues in mind. If you want to help, you can always support the CPJ here.

Photo by Manu Brabo via FreeJamesFoley.org

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How To Avoid Getting Fired For Your Blog

When I started blogging about journalism, I did so at the urging of a hiring editor (who didn’t, ultimately, hire me but did inspire me). I had all these great digital skills, she told me, but she asked why had I presented her with carbon-based clips (i.e. paper) instead of a URL. I left the job fair and put the years of web design experience I’d been amassing to good work, and by the end of the weekend had built myself a website with clips, a resume, a bio and a blog about, what else, journalism and my place in the evolving industry.

That was a few months before my college graduation. And after putting so much work into the blog, I proudly stamped the URL on my resume and included it in my cover letters to prospective employers. To be honest, the blog’s inclusion wasn’t so much a way to show off my work as to cover my ass. When I interviewed for jobs, I discussed it. When I was hired, I searched the employee handbook and intranet for information about personal blogs. Soon after I arrived, I sat down with the executive editor and we discussed it. See, what kept me up late at night wasn’t the prospect of graduating without a job, but rather I did not want one of those editors to plug my name in Google and come across my blog, assuming I had hid or was hiding it.

I had flashbacks to that period and those decisions when I heard the story of Khristopher Brooks, who was fired this week from the job he hadn’t yet started because of the way he announced his new job on his tumblr blog. Brooks did a silly thing, but in my opinion, the folks he thought would soon be his new bosses did an even sillier one. (In my honest opinion, I think they come off looking out-of-touch and overly cautious for a news organization currently force-feeding its employees the “digital first!” company line, and he comes off probably having dodged a bullet.)

Here’s what got Brooks fired, and then, here’s my been-there-done-that advice on how to not get fired for your personal journalism blog.
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Tweeting Like It’s 1999

Catherine Giotto is a 25-year-old newspaper reporter whose Twitter bio says she tweets about life on the cops beat in Silicon Valley. She watches “That 70s Show.” She has aspirations to work at a bigger daily. Oh yeah — she’s also tweeting from 1999. Read more

78 Percent Of U.K. Newspaper Articles Are Written By Men. Is U.S. Media Any Better?

A writer for the United Kingdom’s the Guardian recently conducted an informal analysis and found that in an average month, 78 percent of newspaper articles are written by a man.

Last June, for four weeks, Kira Cochrane and a small team “doggedly” counted the bylines of every single story that appeared in the Monday-Friday editions of seven newspapers — the Daily Mail; the Guardian; the Times; the Daily Telegraph; the Daily Mirror; the Sun; and the Independent. They kept track of if the author was a male or a female.

“There wasn’t a single day, on a single newspaper, when the number of female bylines outstripped or equalled the number of male bylines,” Cochrane found.

At the end of the month we averaged all the daily percentages and the results were: the Mail, 68% male bylines, 32% female; the Guardian, 72% male, 28% female; the Times, 74% male, 26% female; the Daily Telegraph, 78% male, 22% female; the Daily Mirror, 79% male, 21% female; the Sun, 80% male, 20% female; and the Independent, 84% male, 16% female.

Okay, that is the United Kingdom. What about in the United States?

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How, When To Request Interviews On Twitter

If you follow many working journalists on Twitter, chances are you also see a fair number of requests for sources. But is that a problem?

Earlier this month, I wrote about the Indy Star testing the #myassignment hashtag to share openly what the newsroom is working on at any given time. I was reminded of that when I read Dan Reimold‘s post about Twitter interview requests over at MediaShift. But his complaint isn’t that journalists are broadcasting the story they’re working on, but rather many are being lazy and seeking sources openly and blatantly on Twitter. They’re using it as a crutch not a tool. Read more

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