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Posts Tagged ‘retweets’

How Every Journalist Can Get More Retweets

For better or for worse, Twitter has become an essential tool of journalists and news outlets alike. Not only can it help in discovering or reporting stories, it’s also valuable in connecting with your audience and gaining eyeballs, which is why retweets are so important. In the latest Mediabistro feature, digital media pros give advice to journos and news orgs on how to ensure that your tweets don’t fall into the Internet abyss. For example, a common rookie mistake is:

3. You don’t have the right followers

When it comes to Twitter, it’s not just the quantity of your followers that counts but also the quality of your followers. “The more influential followers you have, the more likely you are to get to retweets,” said Sree Sreenivasan, Columbia University’s chief digital officer and a digital media professor at its journalism school.

Your followers’ followers can actually have a profound impact on the distance your tweets can go. “Think about the folks that are following you and who are following them,” Sreenivasan said.

Get four more tips in The Real Reason You’re Not Getting Retweeted.

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Retweeting Without Reading? Yeah, It’s Happening– and It Affects Journalism Strategy on Twitter

Worth noting for journalists looking to measure engagement on the Twitters: your retweets aren’t necessarily your click-throughs, and the two unfortunately may have almost no correlation either.

Hubspot’s Dan Zarrella analyzed 2.7 million tweets that contained links, and his findings show that the retweets and click-throughs had only a sad Pearson’s correlation coefficient of .038. More vividly (and perhaps this is a stat that’s easier to understand), an entire 16.12 percent of the link-containing tweets Zarrella analyzed generated more retweets than clicks.

Digesting those stats, that means your assumptions are probably right when you notice a weirdly fast retweet, or see a RT of something that you already recognize as not true: Zarrella’s study implies many people tweet a link without even clicking on that link.

Forget about “RT are not endorsements.” RTs may not even be an acknowledgement that a particular link was clicked, let alone read.

Read more

What Do Followers Really Want? Not An RSS Feed

While there’s plenty of debate about what journalists should post and to retweet on social networking sites, there’s not enough discussion about what’s not getting posted. Specifically, most of what’s debated is about what news organizations want to share — not what followers actually want to see.

I’m sure there are reams of data floating around corporate offices full of feedback from focus groups and online surveys about what readers want. Yet most news organization feeds are bastions of one-way discussion and self-promotion.

Heidi Moore: The point of being on Twitter is to talk to peopleWhile there’s certainly a place for sharing content on these networks, it’s not the end-all-be-all. In fact, it’s not all that useful. Twitter and Facebook aren’t RSS feeds, and they shouldn’t be used that way. They should be used to engage audiences, and to engage audiences requires more than a requisite run down of your top stories. Read more

When Tweeting Can Cost You Your Job, What About Retweets?

Last week, The Associated Press updated its social media guidelines to address the issue of retweets. Since then, the new guidelines’ concern with bias and objectivity sparked much online debate from reporters, social media enthusiasts, and media critics alike. David Carr of The New York Times Media Decoder blog tweeted: “AP to staff: Don’t retweet anything with an opinion. http://bit.ly/rKbgDE Good luck with that.”

Jeff Sonderman at Poynter introduced the idea of a “neutral retweet,” placing “NT” at the beginning of a retweet to convey: “I do not necessarily agree with this statement, but I thought it was notable enough to call to your attention.” While many in the Twittersphere concurred with this idea, for some, it brought up more fundamental issues of objectivity and journalism.

At GigaOm, Matthew Ingram lamented the requirement that journalists pretend not to have opinions, saying this suggests, “viewers or readers are too stupid to figure out where the truth lies.” He argues that these social media policies actually make things worse, and has recommended positive social media policies that tell journalists how to tweet instead of what not to tweet. Read more

AP updates social media guidelines to address retweets

The Associated Press released new guidelines today on how staffers should handle re-tweets. Here’s the text of the new section of their guidelines.

RETWEETING

Retweets, like tweets, should not be written in a way that looks like you’re expressing a personal opinion on the issues of the day. A retweet with no comment of your own can easily be seen as a sign of approval of what you’re relaying. For instance:

RT @jonescampaign smith’s policies would destroy our schools

RT @dailyeuropean at last, a euro plan that works bit.ly/xxxxx.

These kinds of unadorned retweets must be avoided.

However, we can judiciously retweet opinionated material if we make clear we’re simply reporting it, much as we would quote it in a story. Colons and quote marks help make the distinction:

RT Jones campaign now denouncing smith on education: @jonescampaign smith’s policies would destroy our schools

RT big European paper praises euro plan: @dailyeuropean “at last, a euro plan that works” bit.ly/xxxxx.

These cautions apply even if you say on your Twitter profile that retweets do not constitute endorsements.

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