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Posts Tagged ‘smartphones’

A New Space and Time for News

This is a guest post by Zohar Dayan, CEO and co-founder of Wibbitz, which provides automated text-to-video technologies.

video_iphoneThe ubiquity of the smartphone is changing content consumption. The space in which we get our news has narrowed from a newspaper broadsheet to a 4-inch screen, and the time in which we do it has expanded from distinct periods in the day into a constant checking and re-checking of various streams of content.

As the time and the space in which we get our news changes, traditional media needs to adapt fit these new parameters. It’s not only about the format in which we deliver content, but also about the times we choose to deliver it. As a newsreading app, Wibbitz is in a position to notice trends about how and when people like to get their news. We’ve come up with a few tips to help journalists plan and format their content to pull in more readers. Read more

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Survey: People Aren’t News Reading; They’re ‘News Snacking’ [Infographic]

infographicMobiles Republic, a global news syndication company, recently released the results from its 2013 survey of news reading habits.

The study, based off the responses of over 8,000 of its News Republic® app users, indicates that news consumption is rising; as the number of news outlets grows, so do readers’ appetites for accurate, multi-sourced and fresh news.

Here are key takeaways and the full infographic:

People are checking the news more frequently and for shorter amounts of time.

Forget news reading. Today, it’s all about “news snacking,” meaning people are checking the news more often and typically on mobile devices. 75 percent of readers with smartphones and 70 percent with tablets check the news more than once a day. Read more

5 Stats That Should Have Journalism Organizations Thinking About Mobile

It’s no surprise to anyone reading this that mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, are skyrocketing in popularity and usage. But it’s still shocking to see some news sites that aren’t fully optimized for the mobile experience.

I’m guessing some organizations aren’t putting as much stock in it due to resources and actually having people in house who can ensure products work on multiple platforms. But perhaps some organizations just don’t understand the growth in users adopting tablets and smartphones to get the news.

A study released earlier this week by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism, which surveyed 9,513 U.S. adults, shows a clear picture of the growth of mobile usage.

Here are five stats that I believe news organizations will find intriguing:

Read more

Study: Number of Daily Twitter Users Have Doubled

A new study from Pew Internet finds that the number of daily Twitter users among adults has doubled since May of last year, even though the overall percentage of Twitter users has only grown 2 percent since that time. The authors of the study attributed the increase to a rise in smartphone usage—smartphone owners are twice as likely as others to use Twitter on a typical day. Young adults have had the largest increase in smartphone usage, which perhaps explains why 18 to 24-year-old Internet users have undergone the largest increase in Twitter usage: about one third of them use Twitter, and those who use it on a daily basis have doubled.

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Google Glasses: Augmented Reality or Dystopian Horror?

Google is expected to start selling glasses by the end of the year. No, they are not foraying into optometry, but rather finding a new way to stream the contents of your smartphone straight at your eyeballs.  The glasses, which reportedly resemble a pair of Oakley Thumps, will run on Android and be equipped with 3G, 4G, GPS and a low-resolution camera. Other Google technologies like Google Latitudes and Maps could superimpose information to augment your reality—say, tell you what’s nearby, or what your friends think of that restaurant.

The glasses, which are expected to cost around the price of a smartphone ($250-600), would have a small screen a few inches from the wearer’s eye. Seth Weintraub at 9 to 5 Google reports that head tilting would be used to navigate the device, which will be easy to learn, becoming “second nature and almost indistinguishable to outside users.” But one man’s augmented reality could be another’s dystopian horror. The New York TimesNick Bilton thought perhaps the future bodes “throngs of people in thick-framed sunglasses lurching down the streets, cocking and twisting their heads like extras in a zombie movie.” Read more

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