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Posts Tagged ‘social media’

Twitter Direct Message Change Could Make News Tips On Twitter Easier

By this point in time, every reporter has probably tried to reach out to some potential source via Twitter. It’s awkward, and often if the subject is of interest to you they’re probably inundated with other requests.

A quick search today of the phrase “reporter” & “reach” turned up examples of how most of us go about it today:
Finding sources on Twitter is awkward

See, awkward.

Not to mention exposed. What if you want to reach someone without tipping off your competition? What if you don’t want to put all your contact information out there day in and day out? What if you’re trying to reach a bunch of people — you look like a spam bot with tweet after tweet after tweet of the same thing. Plus, it gives off the “he’s just not that into me vibe” to potential sources.

In an ideal world, you’d be able to see their email address or other contact information and take the convo off Twitter where it belongs. That’s not happening. But Twitter recently made a subtle change to direct messages that over time should be good for journalists. You can direct message people who aren’t following you back.
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Why You Need To Verify Tweets Before Including Them In Your Reporting

New York Times social media staff editor Daniel Victor shared a simple tweet last night that says a lot about the hit-and-run-with-it journalism industry today.

The conversation he linked to was his own attempt to connect with a NY resident who had mentioned long voting lines in yesterday’s election. Good thing he verified the author’s intention and didn’t just run with it. Turns out, the tweet was attempting to make a joke:
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HootSuite University Moving into J-School Classrooms

It’s back to school time and the debate about how to teach journalism is already underway. As academics debate the ‘teaching hospital model’ and hackathons, there’s some real time relief for professors at the 101 level– and it’s coming from a brand. HootSuite, the social media management system, has long offered certification programs and paid pro-package ‘educate yourself’ content. Now, they’re moving into higher education.

Launched in 2011,  HootSuite University has already partnered with over 350 universties, including NYU, Syracuse, and Columbia. The program is more than just product training, though that’s included. There’s also a tailored curriculum for journalism and communications professors, which covers topics from the easy stuff like maintaining a social media presence and best practices to story tracking and analytics.

Lesson objectives cover a variety of topics from “How to Live Tweet an Event With Integrity” and “Compare Social Media Analytics with Site Traffic Using Google Analytics. The curriculum follows the “Read, Watch, Do” format, so professors have an archive of articles, videos, and examples to share with students and suggestions for homework assignments like setting up a Tumblr blog and tracking it, or revising a Twitter bio. Professors can follow the curriculum rigorously, or just use it as inspiration. Dr. William Ward, a professor at at the Newhouse School of Communications at Syracuse, uses HootSuite’s program to make more time for other things, he told me via email: 

I integrate HootSuite into the curriculum of all my courses because it frees me up to focus on higher level strategic concepts. Students receive recognized, industry leading professional credentials that give them a competitive advantage in the job arena.

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4 Ways to Rank Higher in Google Search

GoogleOh, Google: the search engine of our life. How many times have you answered our most embarrassing and inane questions — without a second of hesitation (literally)?

Google, in all of its infinite glory, can also be an invaluable tool for building your personal brand online. In the latest Mediabistro feature, we talk to some content marketing pros for their advice on optimizing personal search results:

“One of the many things that Google considers within its algorithm, everyone believes, is fresh and updated content,” says Nick Barron, founder of The Limbertwig, a full-service media marketing company that specializes in online content marketing. “So, if you publish a website and you don’t update it and a year goes by, Google’s going to view that as not so fresh content. If someone with your name or with similar spelling of your name comes behind and has a blog or has a fresher website, then they’re likely to rank more highly on Google than you would, because your content is just sort of stagnant.”

For more tips, read Google Yourself: 4 Ways to Fix Your Online Reputation.

Sherry Yuan

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

In The Age of SEO, How Do You Change Your Name After Marriage?

In all of my preparations for my recent wedding, I didn’t plan for this one question that still lingers over me unsettled more than a week after the pastor pronounced me a wife in late July. How will changing my last name affect my SEO and search engine placement? Is it even OK to change my name professionally in the age of SEO?
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