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Posts Tagged ‘state of the media’

Pew Research Center Releases State of the News Media, Turns Out It’s Not All Bad

pewstatemediaToday, the Pew Research Center released the State of the News Media report. And it’s not as dreary as you might think. They say so themselves:

A year ago, the State of the News Media report struck a somber note, citing evidence of continued declines in the mainstream media that were impacting both content and audience satisfaction. As indicated above and throughout this report, many of these issues still exist, some have deepened and new ones have emerged. Still, the level of new activity this past year is creating a perception that something important, perhaps even game-changing, is going on. If the developments in 2013 are at this point only a drop in the bucket, it feels like a heavier drop than most. The momentum behind them is real, if the full impact on citizens and our news system remains unclear.

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Why Listicles Are Here to Stay

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Listicles, or articles in list form, have been around for decades. Traditional magazines like Cosmopolitan have had them on their cover for years (aka: “10 Sexiest Things To Do With Your Man Tonight!”)

But the resurgence of the listicle online really found its home on BuzzFeed. The news aggregator and youth-centric site is the most famous example of the listicle done right. Peruse the site and you will find thousands of lists on any subject you can think of. Most are humorous, some are enraging, others, uplifting. Take ”21 Pictures That Will Restore Your Faith in Humanity,” an inspiring collection of photographs that has been viewed over 14 million times. They know what they’re doing, and they do it well.  Although BuzzFeed was once known as the silly home of cat memes, it now also focuses on international news and politics. A U.S. Senator recently caused quite a stir by creating his own listicle: ”11 Reasons Why Congress Needs to Fix Student Loan Rates Now,” mixing D.C. policy decisions with images and GIFs.

BuzzFeed’s editorial director Jack Shepherd recently told 10,000 Words via email about what makes listicles so attractive to his millions of readers. But first, he had a few things to say about the word itself. Read more

PEW Study Asks Whether Facebook Would Buy The Washington Post

The big struggle facing this era of journalism is how to keep it profitable online. Tech companies have figured it out, though — according to the PEW Research Center, five technology companies in 2011 accounted for 68 percent of all online ad revenue, not including Amazon and Apple , whose profits come mostly from downloads and devices. So how can newspapers break into the online ad revenue market?

Could we be headed to a world where Facebook buys a legacy media company like The Washington Post? It’s a question pondered in a study from PEW’s State of the Media report, which says that Facebook is expected to account for one out of every five digital display ads sold by 2015.

Examples of these kinds of partnerships are already popping up, the study says, citing the following relationships:

  1. YouTube is funding Reuters to produce original news shows.
  2. Yahoo signed a content partnership with ABC News for video content.
  3. AOL purchased The Huffington Post.
  4. Facebook, with launch of the social reader, has already formed partnerships with The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and The Guardian.
  5. Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes purchased the 98-year-old New Republic magazine

Source: stateofthemedia.org | Via: The Wrap

That said, the study also found that while Facebook and Twitter dominate the intersection of social sharing and news, social media are not yet a strong driver to news. The study found that 9 percent of digital news consumers “very often” follow news recommendations from social media, while more than a third of all consumers go directly to various news sites and apps.  A majority of survey-takers, 56 percent, said that while they often find news on Facebook, it’s usually big enough news that they would have found it elsewhere — a hint that maybe Facebook isn’t vital to the discovery of news.

Readers are also growing increasingly aware of privacy issues online, which could make a hypothetical Facebook-Washington Post acquisition even trickier. According to the PEW study, “roughly two-thirds of the Internet population is uneasy with targeted advertising and search engines tracking their behavior.” This is at the heart of what Facebook does.

What do you think — could you see a future where WaPo is owned by a tech company like Facebook?  Read other key findings and major trends from the PEW report →