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Posts Tagged ‘tablets’

33 Percent of Americans Own an eReader or Tablet

The latest study from the Pew Internet and American Life Project chronicles some unsurprising trends: People are reading less print books, more eBooks, and those who own eBook readers or tablets are on the rise. eReaders saw an almost 10 percent growth in ownership this past year, while the number of people who owned tablets grew 15 percent. That makes 33 percent of Americans eBook reader/tablet owners. Read more

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5 Stats That Should Have Journalism Organizations Thinking About Mobile

It’s no surprise to anyone reading this that mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, are skyrocketing in popularity and usage. But it’s still shocking to see some news sites that aren’t fully optimized for the mobile experience.

I’m guessing some organizations aren’t putting as much stock in it due to resources and actually having people in house who can ensure products work on multiple platforms. But perhaps some organizations just don’t understand the growth in users adopting tablets and smartphones to get the news.

A study released earlier this week by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism, which surveyed 9,513 U.S. adults, shows a clear picture of the growth of mobile usage.

Here are five stats that I believe news organizations will find intriguing:

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Study: iPad Owners Consume More News

A tablet device with a user's index finger resting on the touchscreen.A recent survey from the Reynolds Journalism Institute found that iPad users were more likely to consume news compared to those without iPads. Not only were iPad users across age groups more likely to go to news organizations for information—they also spent more time reading the news compared to people who do not own iPads. Eighty-four percent of iPad users like to keep up with the news on their devices, compared to 63 percent of all mobile device owners.

These numbers may not be all that surprising, but the study also found that two-thirds of those in the 18 to 34 age group spent 5 hours a week consuming content from news organizations. This rose to 7.3 hours a week for those with an iPad in this age group. Interestingly, media consumers over 55 spent less time consuming news on their devices—probably because two-thirds of them have subscriptions to news in print form. This contrasts with the younger age group, where only a quarter of them have print subscriptions. Read more

Fighting the Distractions of Consuming News on Tablets

An interesting article about e-books and our digital culture was on the front page of the New York Times the other day. “Finding Your Book Interrupted … By the Tablet You Read It On,” read the headline.

The article detailed how people who read e-books are frequently distracted by the other apps that are loaded on their iPads, Kindle Fires and Samsung Galaxys:

E-mail lurks tantalizingly within reach. Looking up a tricky word or unknown fact in the book is easily accomplished through a quick Google search. And if a book starts to drag, giving up on it to stream a movie over Netflix or scroll through your Twitter feed is only a few taps away.

Well, in my experience, this is not a problem unique to e-books on tablets. It’s a challenge for any news publisher to compete for a reader’s attention on a device with so many other apps that are simultaneously competing for a reader’s attention (and sending push alerts to let the reader know that). Read more

The Kindle Fire: Amazon’s Answer to the iPad

Looks like the tablet family just got a whole lot bigger. Today, Amazon announced three new e-reading products with impressively low price points that are sure to tantalize even the most fanatical luddites amongst us. Along with an upgrade to their original Kindle, Amazon released two touchscreen e-readers called the “Kindle Touch,” one with free 3G wireless capabilities and one without. What’s so cool about the Kindle Touch is that even though it incorporates the multitouch technology we’ve grown accustomed to in our mobile devices, it still eschews LED backlit screens in favor of E Ink, a format that makes the reading experience much more akin to reading printed copies. It’s also easier to read E Ink in bright environments than it is to do so on backlit devices like the iPad.

But perhaps the most exciting product announced today is the Kindle Fire, Amazon’s answer to the iPad. With a price point significantly lower than the iPad, and no camera or microphone capabilities, the Kindle Fire isn’t a direct competitor to the iPad, but it’s definitely a significant stride in that direction. It’s a smaller color screen device that comes loaded with access to Amazon’s impressive entertainment database of movies, music and books. The tablet runs on Android OS, making it easy to sync your Google and Amazon accounts on the device. The Kindle Fire’s affordable price is what makes it a formidable opponent. A Kindle Fire device is just $199, compared to $499 for the least expensive iPad model.

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