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Posts Tagged ‘technology’

Bring Your Multimedia Savvy to Wired.com

Wired.comAccording to its website, “Wired is the first word on how ideas and innovation are changing the world.”

With 17 million unique monthly visitors, Wired.com is the go-to source on everything tech-related. Across the site’s channels, readers might find a piece on autonomous cars in “Gear,” a space photo of the day in “Science,” the latest gaming news in “Entertainment” or a how-to on building cell phone jammers in “Design.” Wired.com also publishes opinion columns and original video programs, like “The Window: How the Wired World Works.”

Have a great multimedia idea in mind? Editors welcome pitches as long as the content is unique and relevant to the site’s tech culture theme.

For more info, read How To Pitch: Wired.com.

Sherry Yuan

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Rev3′s Adam Sessler Discusses the Ethics of Review Journalism

Adam Sessler, a popular gaming reporter and former host of Attack of the Show on NBC’s now-defunct G4 (now known as the Esquire Network), has built his career on giving honest reviews of entertainment and tech products for his longtime, gaming-obsessed fans. As the host of online TV show network Revision 3′s weekly segment  ”Sessler Something,” he’s successfully bringing his same upfront and magnetic personality to Youtube. But, his normally ardent fans felt Sessler hit a sour note last week, placing a Slim Jim ad that promoted a contest with Electronic Arts — right before a review of Dead Space 3. Immediately, viewers cried foul of his ethics.

In response to the accusation of a “pay for play” review — hinting that he could have taken a kick-back for a positive review of the game by EA — Sessler tackled the issue head-on in this week’s video, titled, “Publishers, Game Journalists, and OTHER EVILS!” In it, he firmly denies that the EA logo before the review was anything more than an honest mistake, and adds that he and his producers decided not to fix it because “The horses were out of the barn.” Read more

5 iPad Apps Journalists Should Try For Interviews

When Apple first announced its fourth-generation iPad and iPad Mini, I’m sure many journalists out there were extremely excited for the opportunity to get their hands on these new gadgets. I know I was. But for all the functional uses the iPad provides us, I wonder how many journalists have truly incorporated it into an everyday work tool? I know I haven’t.

In terms of incorporating into an everyday work tool, I’m not referring to using it as a device for reading content, sending emails, or communicating through social media channels. I’m talking about using it in the field – whether that’s shooting video, taking photos, writing pieces on the go or using the technology for interviews. This last point is something that I’ve never used the iPad for because I often use a voice recorder or take hand notes.

So I did some digging, and asked for some suggestions, and these are five apps (listed in alphabetical order) that I think are great for handling interviews.

1. Dragon Dictation

 I’ve been pleasantly surprised by the accuracy and speed of Dragon Dictation, which transcribes voice recordings into text. According to a description of the app, “it’s up to five times faster than typing on the keyboard,” and I can note that it is pretty accurate in picking up my voice and translating that to copy. This information can then be sent via text message, email, social media platforms, and much more. The only downside of this app is that you need a Wi-Fi connection in order to do any transcribing. On the positive side, this app is free to download.

Read more

WSJ‘s iPad Editor Tells How to Get a Job Like His

The rise of new media may be a bane for the print medium, but it certainly is a boon for the more tech-inclined. David Ho, editor of mobile, tablets and emerging technology at The Wall Street Journal is one of those folks.

He helped develop the WSJ‘s iPad app, one of the first from a major newspaper. But he also has some serious journalism chops: Ho has covered national consumer affairs for the AP and reported on telecom and terrorism for Cox Newspapers. In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? series, he gives advice to aspiring mobile editors and tells how news orgs should approach new technology.

“A lot of news skills only come with experience. I love it when folks can do Photoshop and the like, but more than any one kind of expertise, it’s important to have a general and deep technology comfort level and interest. This is all moving so fast, you have to adapt daily, hourly. It’s as much about making news decisions as it is troubleshooting tech problems. You need to be able to talk to developers as much as you talk to reporters and editors. You need a foot in each world, editorial and technology.”

For more, read So What Do You Do, David Ho, Mobile and Tablets Editor at The Wall Street Journal?

Inside The Newsroom Of 1996 (VIDEO)

Election Day Nov. 5, 1996 at The Miami Herald from Robertson Adams on Vimeo.

I just came across this video that was shot on Election Day 1996 in the newsroom of the Miami Herald. The video offers a reminder about how far newsroom technology has come in 15 years.

In this video, people are still using terminals that feature lime-green text on a black background. What is billed as the Herald‘s first digital camera is unboxed–and tested (much to the chagrin of some less than photogenic newsroom colleagues).

My favorite part comes toward the end of the video (at about 27 minutes in), when the paper’s paste up process is shown. Editors deliberate about which of three splash headlines should be used for the paper’s A1 page.

As someone too young to have worked in a newsroom in this era, I find the video fascinating. For those who did work at newsrooms during the paste up era, the video will surely be nostalgic.

And, of course, as you watch, think of how different (and faster) this process is now with all the technology that we take for granted!

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