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Posts Tagged ‘The Huffington Post’

HuffPo Will Never Hire You

fergusonfellowshipI would begin by ranting about new lows in paying journalists, but the events in Ferguson are already so gut wrenching on their own that it would be a bit dramatic.

That doesn’t mean that crowdfunding a journo is ok. Today, The Huffington Post announced that it is going to allow local resident Mariah Stewart to train with their staffer Ryan Reilly to:

…cover the ongoing story of Ferguson, tracking the federal investigation into the killing of Michael Brown and reporting on the empaneled grand jury. She’ll monitor the activity of the local and county police forces once the national spotlight dims, and will learn the intricacies of public records requests in an effort to divine the funding sources and uses of military gear in the county.

They’re calling it the Ferguson Fellowship and it will all be done through Beacon. Is this a good idea? It’s certainly true that the best images and live reporting from what I’ve come to think of as the seventh level of hell, has come from residents on the ground.

fergusonfellowship2

But, but. Why can’t they just hire another reporter? Because while I’m all about empowering and training and teaching young journalists (and it’s nice that she’s a woman), I also know a lot of people who paid large universities (like Ms. Stewart) to learn the craft and could sure as heck use a job this fall. Mariah could probably use a salary with benefits and some paid sick and vacation days, too. The Beacon campaign only goes through if it reaches $40,000. I am curious about how that is paid out to her? Or just to HuffPo? Do they throw Reilly a little tip for his troubles?

For some reason, if it were the local Ferguson paper saying “hey, we’re broke and need to hire someone to help continue good coverage” I would be more interested. That The Huffington Post can’t spare $40,000 a year for a reporter makes this freelancer want to curl up into a ball and listen to the new Taylor Swift album, a sure a sign as any that the world is coming to an end.

And then, some rewards for donating. For $2,000 you can get a shout out from the HuffPo Twitter account. Seriously.

What do you think about the Fellowship? Let us know @10,000Words.

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Gawker’s Kinja Platform: Please Don’t Make Me Blog for You

It finally happened. I’m not ashamed to admit that I’m a bit of a Gawker groupie and I’ve been waiting for the rollout of Kinja on all of their sites. Not because I am an avid commenter (that requires more dedication than I can give), but because I wanted to see how it was going to work from the sidelines. I have mixed feelings.

 1) Mobile Layouts 

I know that everyone keeps saying that mobile is the future, and it is, of course. Fine. But I still don’t know how I’m supposed to work on a tablet. The old Gawker layout was optimized for a desktop experience, with the main blog post and a scroll down menu of new and trending posts. You could pick and choose, hop around the site before getting back to whatever you were avoiding before you came to Gawker in the first place.

The new Kinja layout is clean, sleek and modern. Everything you want a digital experience to be — except that you have to scroll around too much. I find myself reading many of the blurbs without actually clicking on a story. And when you do click into a story, that’s it. You have to work to browse. 

On a tablet, the Kinja reading experience makes more sense. Video and ads and posts all come together in one, non-annoying, continuous roll. My reaction to reading the new Gawker on my laptop is the first time I ever felt old. And why can’t you Tweet single posts? What’s the deal, Denton?   Read more

Mobile Users Turn to Established News Sources, Survey Says

There’s a new survey out that paints an interesting picture about how digital news consumers are getting their news. The survey, which was backed by The New York Times, gathered responses from 3,022 U.S. adults between the ages of 18 and 65 to understand the news sources users are accessing.

Of those adults surveyed, 85 percent were categorized as “news consumers” who access news multiple times per week.

According to a Poynter article on the survey, 53 percent of “digital news consumers” noted that they turn to Web-native sources, such as The Huffington Post, Yahoo News, or Drudge Report. Compare this to 43 percent of news consumers who said that they access “established news” organizations, such as The New York Times or CNN, to get their news.

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How To Escape The Newsroom ‘Social Media Guru’ Pigeon Hole

As with many jobs that are either technical in nature, or have a somewhat narrow scope, being the newsroom’s primary social media educator can have a pigeon-holing effect on ones career.

Depending on how advanced the newsroom is when it comes to understanding the basics of how to utilize social media and online communities for their reporting, the process of changing their ways could be ongoing and end up taking years.

Once all is said and done, a few years have gone by and you’re less a reporter and more a social media manager.

For some people that’s a great situation. But for others, it can feel limiting and uncomfortable.

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Good News Is Good (And Now Easier) To Find Online

Good News DigestLast week, the Huffington Post launched its Good News section in a public bet that people will click and read articles online that don’t include sex, violence or celebrities. As one of the holdout optimist journalists (we exist), I’m rooting for the Good Newsies.

Arianna Huffington: I’ve long said that those of us in the media have provided too many autopsies of what went wrong and not enough biopsies. It’s a belief that goes hand-in-hand with HuffPost Good News’ editorial mission to turn our attention to what is working.

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