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Posts Tagged ‘The New York Times’

Uncertain Future for NY Times Reporter Protecting Confidential Source

New York Times reporter James Risen

New York Times reporter James Risen, photo via Alex Menendez, UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

It’s been more than three months since the Supreme Court turned down an appeal from Pulitzer-winning New York Times investigative reporter James Risen, who continues to face the looming threat of jail over his refusal to reveal a confidential source.

Back in June, the Supreme Court basically sided with the government by turning down Risen’s appeal related to a case whereby prosecutors are attempting to secure evidence in what they say is a national security prosecution.

In turn, journalists contend the government is infringing upon Risen’s press freedom by demanding he turn over a confidential source from a chapter in his 2006 book, State of War. Read more

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Editorial Analytics: The Missing Link in Monetization

This is a guest post by Uyen Tieu, the co-founder and CRO of Rumble. She is a seasoned executive in figuring out how media companies make money and how they morph onto new platforms.

analytics

If you’re a traditional content publishing company, the digital age has already been a disruptive force in your industry for a good number of years.

The leaked New York Times Innovation Report serves as yet another wake-up call for the industry. The report highlights how this iconic news organization is seeking innovation, and where news organizations can improve or adopt new strategies. One way to get there is to arm the editorial team with the analytic tools to help drive unique content, readership, engagement and ultimately monetization.

Read more

Knight Foundation Grants $3.89M to Build Open Source Platform for Engaging with Readers

knight2-262x193Yesterday, the Knight-Mozilla Open News initiative announced that it will lead a collaboration among Mozilla, the New York Times, and the Washington Post to create a new platform. With $3.89 million in funding, they’ll work together on a platform that will allow readers and users to upload pictures, videos, and other media for news outlets to use. From the release:

This open-source community platform will allow news organizations to connect with audiences beyond the comments section, deepening opportunities for engagement. Through the platform, readers will be able to submit pictures, links and other media; track discussions; and manage their contributions and online identities. Publishers will then be able to collect and use this content for other forms of storytelling and to spark ongoing discussions by providing readers with targeted content and notifications.

It’s sort of an unusual partnership, but it could turn out to be very fruitful. Instead of shying away from the internet, the projects seems to capture the essence of all things digital and all things journo: it’s open sourced so other outlets can use it, allows for management of data and verification, and treats readers as equal partners in news gathering. If that’s not what the digital publishing industry needs right now, I don’t know what is. The platform will also have a new sort of commenting system where users can highlighting system for journalists to better interact with readers. Instead of banning comments, they plan to make them more useful. Dan Sinker, the head of the Knight-Mozilla Open News Initiative writes on his blog:

Finally, this is a project that has the opportunity not only to improve community engagement in journalism, but to strengthen the web itself. Technologies likeBackbone.jsD3, and Django have all been forged and tested in the demanding environment of the newsroom, and then gone on to transform the way people build on the web. We don’t know that there’s a Backbone lurking inside this project, but we’re sure as hell going to find out.

Here’s to seeing what happens.

Sigma Delta Chi Award Winners Announced

SDX_Awards13Yesterday, the winners of the SPJ’s Sigma Delta Chi awards were announced. You can see a full list of the winners here.

Here are some of the highlights:

  • Those of you feeling like Dasani was robbed for the Pulitzer will be happy to know that “Invisible Child” won for non-deadline reporting.
  • Overall, reporting on the Boston Marathon bombing scooped up awards not just for deadline reporting, but photography, too. Then, among all the tragedy, this photo won in the regional publication category.
  • No surprise: The Texas Tribune won for deadline reporting of the abortion filibuster. And CPI and ABC have another award to spar over for the reporting on black lung.
  • Of all the investigative and public service reporting in print, online, on the radio, and on television; NPR’s Planet Money podcast won for making a t-shirt.

Talk about your favorites in the comments or let us know what you think @10,000Words.

Slate Writer Amanda Hess Wins Sidney Award for Examining Online Sexism

Amanda Hess CoverIn her Sidney Award-winning essay last month in Pacific Standard: “The Next Civil Rights Issue: Why Women Aren’t Welcome on the Internet,” Slate staff writer Amanda Hess tackled yet another facet of cyber-bullying by focusing on the disproportionate abuse that female journalists endure online.

The Sidney Awards are given monthly by the Sidney Hillman Foundation, in recognition of outstanding socially-conscious journalism. Read more

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