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Posts Tagged ‘The New York Times’

Knight Foundation Grants $3.89M to Build Open Source Platform for Engaging with Readers

knight2-262x193Yesterday, the Knight-Mozilla Open News initiative announced that it will lead a collaboration among Mozilla, the New York Times, and the Washington Post to create a new platform. With $3.89 million in funding, they’ll work together on a platform that will allow readers and users to upload pictures, videos, and other media for news outlets to use. From the release:

This open-source community platform will allow news organizations to connect with audiences beyond the comments section, deepening opportunities for engagement. Through the platform, readers will be able to submit pictures, links and other media; track discussions; and manage their contributions and online identities. Publishers will then be able to collect and use this content for other forms of storytelling and to spark ongoing discussions by providing readers with targeted content and notifications.

It’s sort of an unusual partnership, but it could turn out to be very fruitful. Instead of shying away from the internet, the projects seems to capture the essence of all things digital and all things journo: it’s open sourced so other outlets can use it, allows for management of data and verification, and treats readers as equal partners in news gathering. If that’s not what the digital publishing industry needs right now, I don’t know what is. The platform will also have a new sort of commenting system where users can highlighting system for journalists to better interact with readers. Instead of banning comments, they plan to make them more useful. Dan Sinker, the head of the Knight-Mozilla Open News Initiative writes on his blog:

Finally, this is a project that has the opportunity not only to improve community engagement in journalism, but to strengthen the web itself. Technologies likeBackbone.jsD3, and Django have all been forged and tested in the demanding environment of the newsroom, and then gone on to transform the way people build on the web. We don’t know that there’s a Backbone lurking inside this project, but we’re sure as hell going to find out.

Here’s to seeing what happens.

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Sigma Delta Chi Award Winners Announced

SDX_Awards13Yesterday, the winners of the SPJ’s Sigma Delta Chi awards were announced. You can see a full list of the winners here.

Here are some of the highlights:

  • Those of you feeling like Dasani was robbed for the Pulitzer will be happy to know that “Invisible Child” won for non-deadline reporting.
  • Overall, reporting on the Boston Marathon bombing scooped up awards not just for deadline reporting, but photography, too. Then, among all the tragedy, this photo won in the regional publication category.
  • No surprise: The Texas Tribune won for deadline reporting of the abortion filibuster. And CPI and ABC have another award to spar over for the reporting on black lung.
  • Of all the investigative and public service reporting in print, online, on the radio, and on television; NPR’s Planet Money podcast won for making a t-shirt.

Talk about your favorites in the comments or let us know what you think @10,000Words.

Slate Writer Amanda Hess Wins Sidney Award for Examining Online Sexism

Amanda Hess CoverIn her Sidney Award-winning essay last month in Pacific Standard: “The Next Civil Rights Issue: Why Women Aren’t Welcome on the Internet,” Slate staff writer Amanda Hess tackled yet another facet of cyber-bullying by focusing on the disproportionate abuse that female journalists endure online.

The Sidney Awards are given monthly by the Sidney Hillman Foundation, in recognition of outstanding socially-conscious journalism. Read more

Anthony Shadid Award Recognizes Ethical Journalism

Anthony Shadid, courtesy University of Wisconsin

Anthony Shadid, courtesy University of Wisconsin

New York Times correspondent Anthony Shadid died in 2012 from a severe allergic reaction while crossing the Syrian border on assignment for the paper.

A highly accomplished journalist, Shadid had already won two Pulitzer Prizes for his courageous and insightful foreign correspondence.

As a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Shadid sat on the school’s center for journalism ethics advisory board and was a strong supporter of efforts to promote public interest journalism and to stimulate discussion about journalism ethics.

In recognition of Shadid’s contributions to the pursuit of ethics in journalism, the school’s center for journalism ethics recently announced a call for nominations for a new, national award: Read more

3 Takeaways From Emma & Bill Kellers’ Recent Missteps

66g8uCriticism surrounding a profile of stage 4 breast cancer patient Lisa Bonchek Adams has been mounting since Guardian writer Emma Keller published a controversial piece Jan. 8, and her husband, New York Times columnist and former executive editor Bill Keller seemed to sympathize with her position in a follow-up.

Adams has been chronicling musings and insights about her illness, sometimes painfully honest, through her personal blog and Twitter for some time now. Keller’s story about Adams, in which she wonders aloud about the “ethics” of tweeting about an incurable, aggressive sickness, as well as Bill Keller’s column, are in poor taste. So much so that the Guardian has removed the original story and begun an “investigation.”

In thinking about this whole unfortunate debacle, I’d like to consider some potential lessons:

1. Just because you can editorialize doesn’t mean you should.

Read more

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