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Posts Tagged ‘The Wall Street Journal’

The Biggest Challenges Facing Publications Today

Mediabistro talked to Mashable’s executive editor and chief content officer Jim Roberts and The Wall Street Journal‘s emerging media editor Liz Heron at Social Media Week in New York. WSJ hosted a panel at the event, which focused on the effects of social and mobile on journalism.

For Heron, the biggest challenge is the new competition that publications face from social networks. “Our friends in Silicon Valley are creating so many engaging experiences that are competing with us [for] people’s time and interest,” she said. “It’s also an opportunity… We can be a part of that revolution instead of being cut out by it.”

“One of [Mashable's] challenges/opportunities, is taking a lot of the traffic that we get from social channels and keeping them,” said Roberts. “I think all of us in the news/information world face that challenge in one way or another.”

For more, check out our sister site, SocialTimes.

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NY Women In Communications Panel: ‘Where Is The Print Industry Going?’

Print-Vs-Digital

Dow Jones recently hosted a panel discussion presented by New York Women In Communications. The topic: Where is the print industry going?

The panel was moderated by Rebecca Blumenstein, deputy editor-in-chief of the Wall Street Journal, while the panelists included: Susan Schulz, editorial brand director, CosmopolitanAna Maria Allessi, vice president, digital innovation & publisher of HarperAudio at HarperCollins and Julie Zhu, director of digital circulation marketing for Barron’s and MarketWatch.

The hour-long discussion touched on a myriad of topics, including branding, print vs. digital and the struggles of online advertising. Here, a few snippets from the conversation between three media heavyweights:

Allessi, on the evolution of eBooks: “eBooks are extremely popular. They continue to grow and be a huge percentage of units sold. But we have seen it start to level out. I would guess we’re all reading a little bit more. We have something to read in our pockets at all times now.”

Schulz, on Cosmopolitan‘s digital crossover: “The whole digital thing has really opened up an opportunity for [Cosmo], if we would just see it that way. There are still people that are nervous about it. I think it’s because we’re just at the beginning, we haven’t seen it all play out yet. There’s much more of a melding of this idea that you’re not a print editor or a web editor, you’re an editor.” Read more

WSJ‘s iPad Editor Tells How to Get a Job Like His

The rise of new media may be a bane for the print medium, but it certainly is a boon for the more tech-inclined. David Ho, editor of mobile, tablets and emerging technology at The Wall Street Journal is one of those folks.

He helped develop the WSJ‘s iPad app, one of the first from a major newspaper. But he also has some serious journalism chops: Ho has covered national consumer affairs for the AP and reported on telecom and terrorism for Cox Newspapers. In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? series, he gives advice to aspiring mobile editors and tells how news orgs should approach new technology.

“A lot of news skills only come with experience. I love it when folks can do Photoshop and the like, but more than any one kind of expertise, it’s important to have a general and deep technology comfort level and interest. This is all moving so fast, you have to adapt daily, hourly. It’s as much about making news decisions as it is troubleshooting tech problems. You need to be able to talk to developers as much as you talk to reporters and editors. You need a foot in each world, editorial and technology.”

For more, read So What Do You Do, David Ho, Mobile and Tablets Editor at The Wall Street Journal?

How The Wall Street Journal Is Using Facebook to Cover Facebook

In March, around the time Facebook launched its Timeline format, Poynter published a piece declaring “Facebook Timeline not yet a friend to news organizations.” The post’s author, Jeff Sonderman, wrote “the flashy visual template adds too little style while removing too much substance.”

The social media team at The Wall Street Journal might beg to disagree. In an innovative piece of social journalism, WSJ reporters and editors are using Facebook’s Timeline tool to cover Facebook’s initial public offering.

The news org has created a new Facebook page, www.facebook.com/GoesPublic, using Timeline to not only chronicle its IPO roadshow but to also tell the history of Facebook.

Read more

How The Wall Street Journal Uses Pinterest

While Pinterest is taking many newsrooms by storm, there may still be some editors who are hesitant or unsure about how to go about using the online scrapbooking site. Why not take a page — or in this case a board — from The Wall Street Journal?

Recently, the venerable news organization started experimenting with how to use Pinterest and created a Quotes board. Its description partially reads: “Editors are pinning memorable quotes appearing in The Wall Street Journal.”

Each pin is an image of a quote from a recent WSJ story shown floating over a column of blurred out text, much like pull-quotes do in an actual story. A short description accompanies each pin, allowing the quote to stand alone. By clicking on an individual quote, readers/pinners are taken to the original story it was published in.

“There are so many memorable soundbites out there,” said Brian Aguilar, a social media editor at the news organization who helped come up with the idea for the board. ”This gives you the opportunity to really highlight them and pique people’s interest in a story.”

This board can easily be replicated in newsrooms everywhere. I spoke (via email) with Aguilar to learn more about the board’s inspiration, how the images are created, and why the WSJ team isn’t worried about Pinterest and copyright issues.  Read more

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