GalleyCat AppNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘tips’

Does Your Newsroom Need a Facebook Ad Budget?

For news organizations that have taken the plunge into Facebook and have made Facebook a part of their daily communications, there is something else that they should consider.

Like businesses, news organizations can use Facebook advertising as a way to attract new readers and listeners.

If the news organization posts stories and photos to its page, there’s a significant opportunity to get traction out of those posts, in the form of Facebook advertising. Facebook enables advertisers to create ads out of photos and text that they’ve posted to their wall.

Every story is going to have a different target demographic likely to be interested in it.

By having the organizational flexibility to run ads based on varying demographic targeting, news organizations have an opportunity to get exposure with different audiences every day.

Many news organizations are fighting for the budget they can get, often with little or nothing left over. So finding money for advertising will be challenging. But for those who are able to do some experimenting, it could yield positive outcomes.

Should Reporters Create Online Communities For Their Beats?

In the last few years social media has become about more than Facebook and Twitter.

Other sites have been created that deal with a specific topic. Their membership numbers are small in number, but the topics discussed often garner a lot of activity because the people on the site are passionate about the subject.

When I think about subject-matter expertise in a newsroom, I think of a beat writer/reporter. In the newsroom, they are the subject-matter experts for the beat that they are assigned to cover.

They have a first-hand knowledge of the topic and the issues at hand and they have relationships with the people who are impacted or make decisions about the topic.

In the world of social media and online communities, they would be ideal community managers.

Read more

Social Media Roundup: The Connected Customer, Social Media Crisis Comms, Timeline for Power Users, and more

Every Friday I post links to a few of the blog posts that I read during the week that I found interesting and insightful.

Included in this week’s round-up is discussion about the connected customer and what that means for brands and media; why it’s good to use social media as part of crisis communications; Timeline tips for power users; how Facebook “likes” are similar to e-mail opt-in; and why you should pay social media interns.

Read more

How To Avoid Getting Fired For Your Blog

When I started blogging about journalism, I did so at the urging of a hiring editor (who didn’t, ultimately, hire me but did inspire me). I had all these great digital skills, she told me, but she asked why had I presented her with carbon-based clips (i.e. paper) instead of a URL. I left the job fair and put the years of web design experience I’d been amassing to good work, and by the end of the weekend had built myself a website with clips, a resume, a bio and a blog about, what else, journalism and my place in the evolving industry.

That was a few months before my college graduation. And after putting so much work into the blog, I proudly stamped the URL on my resume and included it in my cover letters to prospective employers. To be honest, the blog’s inclusion wasn’t so much a way to show off my work as to cover my ass. When I interviewed for jobs, I discussed it. When I was hired, I searched the employee handbook and intranet for information about personal blogs. Soon after I arrived, I sat down with the executive editor and we discussed it. See, what kept me up late at night wasn’t the prospect of graduating without a job, but rather I did not want one of those editors to plug my name in Google and come across my blog, assuming I had hid or was hiding it.

I had flashbacks to that period and those decisions when I heard the story of Khristopher Brooks, who was fired this week from the job he hadn’t yet started because of the way he announced his new job on his tumblr blog. Brooks did a silly thing, but in my opinion, the folks he thought would soon be his new bosses did an even sillier one. (In my honest opinion, I think they come off looking out-of-touch and overly cautious for a news organization currently force-feeding its employees the “digital first!” company line, and he comes off probably having dodged a bullet.)

Here’s what got Brooks fired, and then, here’s my been-there-done-that advice on how to not get fired for your personal journalism blog.
Read more

What Are Basic Social Media Skills Journalists Need?

By now the consensus is that most journalists should “know how to use social media” in their day-to-day jobs.

But what does that really mean?

Here’s a short list of skills that I believe should be part of the basic social media skill set for a journalist today:

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>