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Posts Tagged ‘twitter for newsrooms’

Does Your Newsroom Throwback on Thursday?

hashtagIn the name of clicks, and appearing to be social media savvy, news organizations have hopped on the #tbt train. For those that live under a rock, #tbt is the hashtag used for “Throwback Thursday,” an excuse to post your prom picture on Instagram, or tweet a link to an old blog post you’re especially proud of.

News organizations have started their own throwback features as an excuse for mid-morning Thursday content. When done well, it works as a good way to get people to dig through your archives or remind people of your authority, as in, “we’ve always covered politics, here’s a piece from 1943 to remind you of our expertise.” Read more

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Get Your Foot Out Of Your Mouth

twitter logoIt’s amazing that it’s almost 2014 and people are still getting fired for saying horrible, no good things on social media. Haven’t we learned that what you say can and will get you in trouble?

Whether it’s Duck Dynasty’s patriach or IAC’s “accidental racist” Justine Sacco, people still aren’t learning that words have consequences. Over at On the Media’s TLDR Blog, PJ Vogt points out that Sacco, for example, had a long history of making bad jokes, and it’s surprising that she hadn’t come to the internet’s attention before. I agree. And what’s interesting isn’t that she hadn’t been in trouble before, or that shows and jobs can be lost, but that some people are still outraged or confused as to why media companies — or any company, for that matter — can take action against you for your words.

Be careful what you tweet, reporters. What might get a smirk or a laugh in the newsroom is destined to be spread around the internet if it rubs someone the wrong way. Quarrels among copy editors shouldn’t be taken to Twitter. You don’t have to be a bigot or a jerk, either. An unpopular opinion with a link to a story could do it, too.

I think Jay Rosen put it best:

 

3 Ways to Up Your Reader Engagement

We all have social media and digital best practices coming out of ears. But after thinking about how big media companies make their dough, I realized that, although there aren’t always the resources and staff and innovation teams at smaller papers, there are some simple, almost silly, tips smaller papers can take from the behemoths in terms of reader engagement. Things that make your organization seem relevant and savvy.

1. Go Vice

Ok, you don’t have to start covering the sex beat in your town, but start thinking outside the box. Vice isn’t just a magazine anymore, it’s also a production company, and a marketing agency. Is there a crime beat reporter who could easily start posting video reports along with his written one? Are there events or causes you could sponsor that you aren’t? Run a summer program where high school students can run their own vertical. Nothing is more niche than a local hometown. Be all over it. If there is a kinky sex beat, start covering it.   Read more

How Every Journalist Can Get More Retweets

For better or for worse, Twitter has become an essential tool of journalists and news outlets alike. Not only can it help in discovering or reporting stories, it’s also valuable in connecting with your audience and gaining eyeballs, which is why retweets are so important. In the latest Mediabistro feature, digital media pros give advice to journos and news orgs on how to ensure that your tweets don’t fall into the Internet abyss. For example, a common rookie mistake is:

3. You don’t have the right followers

When it comes to Twitter, it’s not just the quantity of your followers that counts but also the quality of your followers. “The more influential followers you have, the more likely you are to get to retweets,” said Sree Sreenivasan, Columbia University’s chief digital officer and a digital media professor at its journalism school.

Your followers’ followers can actually have a profound impact on the distance your tweets can go. “Think about the folks that are following you and who are following them,” Sreenivasan said.

Get four more tips in The Real Reason You’re Not Getting Retweeted.

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

From Twitter’s Headquarters, Data-Driven Best Practices For Journalists

Mark Luckie speaking to journalists at Twitter headquarters.

SAN FRANCISCO — Every time I train a new reporter on how to use Tweetdeck or set up a Twitter account, I get the questions about “best practices.” You probably do, too, as you train your news staff. Sure, we can tell them to use hashtags and at-replies, but then you get the question of “Why?” because, of course, you’re training journalists. Now you have the why.

Twitter’s Mark Luckie (original founder of this blog) announced a few Twitter best practices for journalists at Twitter’s headquarters for journalists at the ONA conference. All of his tips and tricks have real, hard data to back up how those practices increase engagement and followers. The slideshow was posted in blog post format on Twitter’s blog, but here are a few key points (most of which you probably already know, in general).

For their research methodology, Twitter looked at 150+ journalists and news publishers and analyzed thousands of tweets over a six-month period.

  1. Tweet your beat and tweet it live: For people who post a concentrated number of tweets in a short time span (i.e. liveblogging coverage), follower growth is 50 percent more than average.
  2. Use hashtags for context: Yep, we all know this one, but you probably didn’t know that it can increase engagement almost 100 percent (2x) for individuals and 50 percent (1.5x) for brands.
  3. @Cite your sources: This stat is a bit confusing, but it says that brands that tweet 20 percent fewer URLs and 100 percent more @mentions grow followers 17 percent more than average. This means you should mix up your tweet style to post a mixture of links and mentions to grow your audience. Again, probably something we all already knew.
  4. Share what you’re reading: News accounts receive 100 percent more (2x) active engagement on a high-performing tweet when a URL is included. Also, use that retweet button!

You can read the full list of recommendations with examples on Twitter’s blog →

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