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Posts Tagged ‘video journalism’

TV News Search and Borrow: Knight Foundation Funds Expansion of Internet Archive Service

The Internet Archive announced this week that it received a $1 million donation from the Knight Foundation to expand it’s TV News Search and Borrow archive of television news clips. As of now, the archive has just over 400,000 clips that the public can access, link to, or borrow a hard copy for a fee.

“We want to make all knowedge available to everyone, forever, and for free. So it’s an ambituous mission,” laughs Roger Macdonald, the archive’s television news project director. 

And it all comes down to closed captioning.

The San Francisco based non-profit records broadcasts, and teases out the news using closed captioning tags and other meta-data. Twenty-four hours after the first airing, the clip is available in the archive. It’s an invaluable resource for journalists, researchers, and documentarians to study what was said, when, where, and in what context. Want to play John Stewart? Go ahead and search clips of ‘Benghazi’ on Fox last week. It can also be used for more noble causes, like tracking political speech. Read more

Vourno: A Crowd-Funding Platform for the News

If Joe Verdirame has his way, we’re all going to be ‘vournos’ pretty soon. You heard me: vourno, or a video journalist. Along with his brother and some friends from college, none of whom are practicing journalists, Verdirame has created the first crowdfunding platform focused solely on the news.

Set to launch this May with a handful of ready videojournalists, Vourno works much like other crowdfunding sites such as Kickstarter or Indiegogo, with a viewing platform to boot.

Explains Verdirame:

We love the news, but we saw this hole that needed to be fixed. We’re just for news, and we’re not just a funding platform, we’re providing an independent news network, a platform where users can build a portfolio, and their pieces get rated. With our platform, you get to see the end result and you can keep following your vourno.

Journalists who want to produce their own magazine news show, cover a story they feel is missing from the mainstream, or head overseas to break news, create a Project, in Vourno parlance. Each project has thirty days to reach its funding goal. Once it gets funded, the journalist goes out to produce the segment and then posts in on the Vourno site.

If you’re not a journalist, you can head to Vourno to donate and fund a project, submit an idea, or just watch the news.

Some exciting features: Read more

Please Don’t Use Vine: It’s Boring

When Vine was launched in January, I immediately thought it could be a new tool for reporters and wrote about it here. I didn’t have any particular good ideas, but was interested to see how people could use it.

Months later, the journalism-focused blogosphere is finally getting excited about it. But going so far as to say it’s “shaking up the news world” is a bit of a stretch.

Frankly, I’m not buying it for two major reasons:

1) The six second, GIF-like looping of video makes Vines some of the most boring video content out there. What could be done with a good photo is instead exploited and worn out with the app. In fact, “Finite Vine” would be a welcome addition.

2) Audio helps with context and Vine’s capability for voiceovers is great. But after seeing some Vines, I’m glad the default volume status is mute. It makes me want to push for other video channels, like HuffPost Live, to run the same way. I’m on a constant mission to hit the mute button on most videos on news websites before playback starts. It feels like a constant attack.

If Twitter is an incessant feed of things you’ll probably never get around to reading, or really need to know, then Vines just add to that noise. There’s a reason why traditional broadcasting organizations haven’t taken to it. You need more than six seconds and a GIF to tell a story. Even if it’s just 24 seconds more and two GIFs — anything is better than a Vine.

Let’s stop the madness.

How Can Journalists Use Vine?

What can you get in six seconds or less? A whole lot, apparently.

It’s been a week since Vine, Twitter’s new app for creating, curating, and sharing short videos, hit the iOS App Store and I can’t help viewing every one that comes my way.

The chance to create, post and share a short video means big things for journalists in the field. But as of yet, I’ve only seen one of breaking news and it was a very sad, and very fuzzy, video of the dolphin stuck in a New York City canal last week.

Instead, journalists seem most excited about sharing their view of the newsroom and documenting, very, very quickly, the process of putting together the next edition.

And yet, it’s hard to be skeptical about a new way to post video on the go. Remember when we were all skeptical about Twitter in the first place? Or was that just me? It’s since become our daily, morning briefing with our coffee and the rest of the news-breaking world.

There will be more bad Vine videos to come, and if you’re in the field, six seconds is not a lot of time for context. But let’s not give up just yet or just plug the view from our desks.

Can you think of a way you could use Vine to enhance a story? Have you already? Share them with us in the comments or @10,000Words.

How to Shoot Video from a Smartphone Like a Pro

These days, carrying around a full video rig is the last thing a journalist wants to do when in the middle of important breaking news. Thankfully, the smartphone is rapidly becoming the go-to option for capturing news as it happens, and the rise of HD quality video in such a small package means that more important and newsworthy moments are being captured and shared throughout the world.

The only caveat is, for better for worse, shooting video on a small, light smartphone has a steep learning curve. To get a compelling, color-balanced shot that isn’t shaky or blurry is a mammoth task — an unknowledgeable shooter can easily end up with muddy, diffuse content that isn’t share-worthy.

Luckily, there are some easy and effective tips to get a great shot. Read more

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