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Posts Tagged ‘young journalists’

How to Take the Perfect Photo or Video

photo videoMuch like “proficiency in Microsoft Word,” writing alone isn’t going to cut it anymore in the Internet era; successful journalists need real technical chops — starting with quality picture-taking.  And no, that doesn’t mean buying a $3,000 camera.

If anything is to be taken away from the time the Chicago Sun-Times laid off its entire photography staff, it’s that journos can work with what they’ve got.

In the latest Mediabistro feature, media pros share their tips for taking a good picture or video:

1. Pay Attention to Lighting
“Lighting is everything,” says Charlie Castleman, in-house videographer for esd & associates, a full-service marketing and PR firm based in San Antonio, Texas. As a general rule, if you’re having trouble seeing the subject’s face while you’re shooting, the viewer definitely won’t be able to, either. That said, lighting isn’t as difficult as it seems and, says Castleman, “You don’t have to be an expert cinematographer that spends three hours [on] lighting.”

For more on wielding a camera like a pro, read 6 Tips to Help You Take the Perfect Perfect Photo or Video.

Sherry Yuan

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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3 Simple Goals For Summer Interns

Photo by Nathan Wells, on Flickr

It’s mid-May, which means it’s about time for journalism schools to send their army of relatively inexperienced student journalists and recent graduates out into the professional world for a test run. Yep, in a few weeks if not already, young, impressionable cub journalists will turn up in newsrooms eager to do everything.

If you’re among the intern ranks this year, here’s your short and simple to-do list for this summer gig.
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How To Avoid Getting Fired For Your Blog

When I started blogging about journalism, I did so at the urging of a hiring editor (who didn’t, ultimately, hire me but did inspire me). I had all these great digital skills, she told me, but she asked why had I presented her with carbon-based clips (i.e. paper) instead of a URL. I left the job fair and put the years of web design experience I’d been amassing to good work, and by the end of the weekend had built myself a website with clips, a resume, a bio and a blog about, what else, journalism and my place in the evolving industry.

That was a few months before my college graduation. And after putting so much work into the blog, I proudly stamped the URL on my resume and included it in my cover letters to prospective employers. To be honest, the blog’s inclusion wasn’t so much a way to show off my work as to cover my ass. When I interviewed for jobs, I discussed it. When I was hired, I searched the employee handbook and intranet for information about personal blogs. Soon after I arrived, I sat down with the executive editor and we discussed it. See, what kept me up late at night wasn’t the prospect of graduating without a job, but rather I did not want one of those editors to plug my name in Google and come across my blog, assuming I had hid or was hiding it.

I had flashbacks to that period and those decisions when I heard the story of Khristopher Brooks, who was fired this week from the job he hadn’t yet started because of the way he announced his new job on his tumblr blog. Brooks did a silly thing, but in my opinion, the folks he thought would soon be his new bosses did an even sillier one. (In my honest opinion, I think they come off looking out-of-touch and overly cautious for a news organization currently force-feeding its employees the “digital first!” company line, and he comes off probably having dodged a bullet.)

Here’s what got Brooks fired, and then, here’s my been-there-done-that advice on how to not get fired for your personal journalism blog.
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Deadline Nears For SPJ Reporters Institute For Young Journalists

spj reports institute logoIf I were still in the first three years of my professional journalism career, I’d be applying for this opportunity with the Society of Professional Journalists. If you do fall within years 1 and 3 of your post-college career and you want to advance your skills in reporting and new media, then you have until Thursday (March 15) to get your application in for the SPJ Reporters Institute this summer.

This program, which runs three days in June at The Poynter Institute in Florida, costs $300 plus travel. For that, you’ll meet some top journalists/instructors (and network with other young peers). The sessions will cover all of the following topics (and more): Read more

Six Journalists Under 30 to Watch, aka ONA Announces MJ Bear Fellows

The Online News Association just announced its inaugural MJ Bear Fellows. The brand-new fellowship is granted to three up-and-coming journalists — all under the age of 30 — whose work represent the best in new media. (We covered the application process back in April.)

While the three winners will be receiving most of the spotlight, I wanted to call attention to the fact that ONA, an organization dedicated to journalism innovation online, gave honorable mention to three other applicants. All of these young journalists, as ONA Executive Director Jane McDonnell said, are “not just growing within the industry, they’re leading the way.”

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